The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Participates in IDCareLive Virtual Series to Increase Clinician Awareness of HIV Testing, Screening & Prevention

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The continuing medical education (CME) series is presented by Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and is available at no cost to learners. To register, please visit IDCareLive.

www.IDCareLive.com is presented by Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

www.IDCareLive.com is presented by Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

We are honored to support the CDC in its efforts to make opt-out HIV screening a standard of care for adults and adolescents. - Robert Rosenbloom, President and CEO of PlatformQ Health

IDCareLive, the leading provider of virtual events in infectious disease, is pleased to announce that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention participated in a HIV virtual education series, Clinical Challenges in the Management of HIV & Hepatitis Virtual Summit Series held on June 25th and July 17th. This two-part online education series was aimed at increasing clinician awareness of HIV testing, prevention and screening as well as to combat the stigma generally associated with HIV and AIDS.

The HIV virtual education series was held live & online at IDCareLive and educated more than 1,500 practicing clinicians over two days. All education sessions are presented by the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, accessible online via live streaming broadcast and provided at no cost to clinicians. Video sessions are now available on demand for 6-months. Watch now at IDCareLive.

“We are honored to support the CDC in its efforts to make opt-out HIV screening a standard of care for adults and adolescents,” said Robert Rosenbloom, President and CEO of PlatformQ Health. “This educational series will address all the latest advances in screening, early detection and prevention of HIV.”

In 2006, the CDC recommended that opt-out HIV screening be a part of routine clinical care for adult and adolescent patients -- a strategy for promoting earlier entry into clinical care and health outcomes for individuals living with HIV as well as a means of decreasing HIV transmission. Earlier this year, the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) released a new Recommendation Statement on screening for HIV, giving a “Grade A” recommendation for routine HIV screening for all people aged 15 to 65, as well as younger adolescents and older adults who are at an increased risk for HIV infection. It also gave a “Grade A” recommendation for HIV screening for all pregnant women, including those in labor whose HIV status is unknown. Educational efforts that help clinicians overcome barriers to HIV testing will substantially aid efforts to improve the HIV treatment cascade.

The continuing medical education (CME) series is presented by Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, approved for AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™ and available at no cost to learners. Educational support provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention HIV Screening. Standard Care.™ and others. To register please visit IDCareLive.

ABOUT IDCARELIVE
IDCareLive is the leading provider of live online medical education conferences in infectious disease. The revolutionary interactive education platform enables epidemiologists, hepatologists, HIV specialists, internal medicine and primary care physicians and other health care practitioners interested in understanding and managing patients with infectious disease to learn about the latest clinical developments, connect online with thousands of peers, engage in real-time Q&A with renowned medical experts and earn AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™.

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