Enteroviruses Cause Type 1 Diabetes; New Studies Support Dr. Hanan Polansky’s Microcompetition Theory

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Enteroviruses have been connected with human type 1 diabetes in a variety of studies according to an article published on October 22, 2013 on sciencedaily.com (1). The CBCD explains the relationship between Microcompetition Theory, enteroviruses, and type 1 diabetes.

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An infection with viruses introduces foreign DNA into the cell. The foreign DNA causes Microcompetition. This causes the human genes to malfunction. A malfunctioning gene causes disease. – Greg Bennett, CBCD

Can certain viruses cause type 1 diabetes? The answer is yes according to two new studies published in the leading scientific journal, Diabetes. The studies showed that these viruses belong to the enterovirus family of viruses (1). Dr. Hanan Polansky’s Theory of Microcompetition specifies the biological mechanism that explains how viruses cause diabetes.

Enteroviruses, specifically, “are common in children, and more than 100 different enterovirus types have been identified in man. A subset of these enteroviruses can cause serious illnesses such as; myocarditis, meningitis, the hand-food-and-mouth disease as well as paralytic disease such as polio. Although the association between type 1 diabetes and enteroviruses has been observed in various studies, until now it was not known which enterovirus types are most responsible for this effect (1).”

One new study showed for the first time that members of the enterovirus, sub-group B coxsackieviruses, are associated with Type 1 Diabetes. Other enterovirus sub-types are not. Study authors wrote that “These findings are in line with other recent reports suggesting that group B coxsackieviruses can spread to the pancreas and damage the insulin-producing cells (1).”

How do these viruses cause damage to the pancreas and insulin-producing cells?

According to the Theory of Microcompetition with Foreign DNA, foreign DNA fragments, called N-boxes, cause most major diseases. When the foreign N-boxes belong to a virus, microcompetition between the viral DNA and the human DNA can lead to disease even when the virus is latent or the viral DNA is broken into pieces and cannot express proteins.

“An infection with viruses introduces foreign DNA into the cell. The foreign DNA causes Microcompetition. This causes the human genes to malfunction. A malfunctioning gene causes disease.” – Greg Bennett, CBCD

The CBCD is happy to see a new study from the journal Diabetes that is consistent with the Microcompetition with Foreign DNA Theory proposed by Dr. Hanan Polansky (2).
To learn more about Dr. Hanan Polansky’s research and the Theory of Microcompetition with Foreign DNA, visit:http://www.cbcd.net

References:

(1)    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131022091721.htm
(2)    http://www.cbcd.net

The CBCD is a research center recognized by the IRS as a 501(c)(3) non-for-profit organization. The mission of the CBCD is to advance the research on the biology of chronic diseases, and to accelerate the discovery of treatments.

The CBCD published the “Purple” book by Dr. Hanan Polansky. The book presents Dr. Polansky’s highly acclaimed scientific theory on the relationship between foreign DNA and the onset of chronic diseases. Dr. Polansky’s book is available as a free download from the CBCD website.

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Hanan Polansky
Center for the Biology of Chronic Disease (CBCD)
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