HomeThangs.com Has Introduced a Guide to the Best Storage Configurations for Antique Bathroom Vanities of All Sizes

The ideal type of storage varies widely depending on the size of the bathroom and the bathroom vanity. HomeThangs.com has introduced a guide to some of the most efficient designs for any size bathroom.

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B&I Direct 60'' Bathroom Vanity Bradford 1310AS

B&I Direct 60'' Bathroom Vanity Bradford 1310AS

The larger the vanity, the greater the freedom of storage, but no matter the size it's important to prioritize the most used items in the most accessible types of storage.

(PRWEB) November 01, 2013

HomeThangs.com – the Online Home Improvement Store – has made their goal to deliver the right product to the consumer. With that in mind, shopping and home design tips, as well as special product selections are being introduced.

When it comes to bathroom vanities, there’s no one perfect kind of storage. What will work best depends both on the size of the bathroom and the people that use it. Antique bathroom vanities are often a little limited in the types of storage there are to choose from, and sometimes the most efficient models can be a little difficult to find. To bridge the gap, HomeThangs.com has introduced a guide to the most efficient types of storage for antique vanities in the most common size ranges.

1. 30” and Under
Most very small antique vanities only have a single under sink cabinet and nothing else, which is probably the least efficient form of storage. One of the very few exceptions are petite bombe chest style vanities, with curved sides and cabriole legs, and, most importantly, between two and three usable drawers instead of a cabinet. As with most bathroom vanities, the top drawer may be a false panel or U-shaped to accommodate the sink and plumbing, but the drawers underneath make for convenient, organized storage that keeps oft-used personal items much more accessible.

2. 36” Vanities
With any smaller vanity the sink and plumbing are often limiting factors. But as soon as a vanity gets more than a few inches wider than that sink, the possibilities for storage opens up considerably. With antique vanities, the sweet spot is about 36" wide, where there’s enough room for both a cabinet and a column of drawers. While this might not afford very big drawers, it combines the best of both a storage cabinet for large items and petite drawers for smaller items. An additional drawer beneath the cabinet also adds storage space for hand towels and washcloths.

3. 40"-48" Vanities
Vanities in the 40”-48” range sport a second column of drawers, one on either side of the main cabinet. This is probably the most common layout in this size range, but it’s at this point that there’s room to begin shifting the parts and pieces around to find more efficient layouts. Replacing the cabinet with drawers and the drawers with smaller cabinets with shelves in them or otherwise rearranging the different storage pieces makes for a little more room to tailor the vanity to the needs of the bathroom.

4. 60"-72" Double Vanities
Somewhere between 48" and 60", antique bathroom vanities transition from single sink cabinets to double vanities. These larger vanities are big, hefty, and have a furniture-like quality that makes them the perfect focal point for a traditional style bathroom. The one complication of antique double vanities is that they have two sinks instead of one. That means that even if they're a full foot wider than a large single vanity, there's a little less room to shift around storage without the plumbing getting in the way. To that end, the most typical layout for a double vanity in the 60" range is to have two standard cabinets bridged by a row of drawers. Add a few inches, though, and there are vanities with drawers on either far end, or better yet, on both ends and in the middle between the sinks.

5. 72" And Up
Antique bathroom vanities really shine in larger spaces. The larger the vanity, the greater the freedom in terms of storage, but the same logic still applies as with smaller vanities: Prioritize the kind of storage that will be used most often, and put it as close to the sink as possible while letting less-used items live farther out of reach. As a final note, for vanities that are 80", 96", or more, look for modular vanities that can be installed in pieces. This makes it not only easier to get the vanity into the bathroom in the first place, but also offers a little wiggle room to reorganize the pieces to rearrange the storage later on.

HomeThangs.com is not only a home improvement superstore, it also provides expert design tips and a comprehensive shopping guide, taking the ideas from professional interior designers, and offering tips to the consumers on how to pick the products to best suit their needs.