Feature on Disposophobia Highlights Negative Impacts on Everyday Life

Disposophobia, or compulsive hoarding, is the unmentioned secret of two to five percent of the world’s population. Address Our Mess, a leading authority in the hoarding cleaning industry, aims their recent release at disposophobics in need of clarity on their condition and courses of action toward recovery.

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Address Our Mess Levels of Hoarding Chart

Sufferers of Disposophobia must first determine their unique Level of Hoarding before planning a course of action.

Once thought to be a bi-product of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, or simply written off as 'eccentric behavior,'disposophobia...has finally been clarified by the American Psychiatric Association as a unique, treatable mental health disorder.

Mount Laurel, New Jersey (PRWEB) November 07, 2013

Upwards of sixteen million Americans struggle with an uphill battle against themselves on a daily basis. Once thought to be a bi-product of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, or simply written off as “eccentric behavior,” compulsive hoarding, also known as disposophobia in the mental health community, has finally been clarified by the American Psychiatric Association as a unique, treatable mental health disorder.

Address Our Mess, with teams of certified hoarding experts in locations across the US, has developed a definitive reference on the disorder called “Disposophobia – How Living with Disposophobia Can Seriously Impact Your Life.” This newly published source of information not only helps disposophobics define their disorder, but outlines how one should determine the best course of action toward recovery.

With companion guides like the Official Hoarding Do’s and Don’ts manual, “Disposophobia…” helps hoarders understand how much their condition affects not only themselves but the people they know and love. Those who struggle with disposophobia are said to suffer from an intense fear of getting rid of or disposing of “things.” No matter how invaluable or insignificant an item may be, hoarders keep adding to their mounds of clutter and junk until much of the livable space in their home becomes obsolete.

While hoarding cleaning services and alternative forms of therapy are suggested recovery methods, hoarders and their helpers must first determine which types of hoarding they are dealing with before designing a course of action. Disposophobia can stem from traumatic events, shopping addictions, or even learned behavior. Experts have determined that getting to the root of the disorder increases the chances of a hoarder leaving their compulsive behaviors behind them.

Disposophobia is linked to the development of other mental and emotional disorders like anxiety and depression. Hoarding can also be associated with physical dangers like fire hazards, asphyxiation due to being trapped under collapsed piles of objects, and sever illnesses brought on by biohazard materials and rodents. The neglected nature of the home can be a harbinger of sickness and even death.

Living with this debilitating condition creates social anxieties that strain relationships and shatter dreams. By utilizing tools such like “Disposophobia – How Living with Disposophobia Can Seriously Impact Your Life,” hoarders can reach the goal of living a happier, healthier life.


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