All Hands Fire Equipment Announces Drastic Price Break on New Hi-Viz 3-in-1 Jacket

All Hands Fire Equipment is announcing a special promotional offer of 50% off of a newly released Waterproof 5-in-1 Hi Viz Jacket.

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Hi Vis Jacket

5-in-1 High Visibility Jacket

Being a 5-in-1 jacket and being that it is 50% off, it really helps for those suffering budget cuts.

Neptune, NJ (PRWEB) October 31, 2013

Driving down just about any highway in America, the construction and road crews are conspicuous in “high visibility” garment. Over the years, high visibility clothing (also called known as Hi-Viz) has dramatically increased. In fact, under US DOT regulations the Hi-Vis clothing is mandated for those who work on the highways.

HI-VIZ garments come in many shapes and forms including jackets, vests, t-shirts, sweatshirts, gloves and hats. Not only do they come in a variety of colors and reflective striping designs, but in recent years, manufacturers have also been sensitive to the consumers’ budgets by introducing the multi-functional 3-in-1 garments.

A New Jersey-based company – All Hands Fire Equipment - recently announced a special promotional offer of 50% off of a new Waterproof 5-in-1 Jacket. This includes a reversible hi-Vis outer jacket, a reversible Hi-Vis inner jacket, a vest all of which is ANSI Class 3 approved. See the Jacket details here: http://www.allhandsfire.com/Waterproof-5-in-1-Jacket-Vest-ANSI-Class-3

“In just the first week of the offer, we received some really great feedback and interest,” said Donald Colarusso, President of All Hands Fire Equipment and a 26 year veteran firefighter. “Being a 5-in-1 jacket and being that it is 50% off, it really helps for those suffering budget cuts,” he said.

In 2012, nearly 4,400 workers were killed according to a US Department of Labor - Bureau of Labor Statistics, which was released on August 22, 2013. The National Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries in 2012 (Preliminary Results) report showed that 24% of these deaths were classified as “roadway incidents.”