STEM Teachers See Impact of Manufacturing Day Tours Organized by Sierra College

After high school STEM students toured local businesses as part of the National Manufacturers Day, teachers are using the experience to help students refine their interest in Advanced Manufacturing careers and bringing real world applications into their classrooms.

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Del Oro High School students look at Progressive Technology’s products.

What students saw on the Manufacturing Day Tour was relevant to what we are doing in the classroom; it helps connect what we do in class with the real world.

Rocklin, CA (PRWEB) November 06, 2013

The tours of Sacramento area companies organized by Sierra College Center for Applied Competitive Technologies(CACT) and the Sierra Science, Technology, Engineering & Math (STEM) Collaborative, have lasting impact long after National Manufacturing Day according to Placer County high school teachers.

Steve Dicus, IB Design Tech teacher at Oakmont High School, who toured Harris & Bruno International in Roseville, CA, reports that he is able to tie the experience into his instruction throughout the semester. “What students saw on the Manufacturing Day Tour was relevant to what we are doing in the classroom,” said Dicus. “It helps connect what we do in class with the real world.”

It also encourages students to consider Advanced Manufacturing careers. “Talking to employees working in the field helps students make decisions about what does and doesn’t interest them,” said Dicus. One of his students said, “It definitely made me more sure of my plans to pursue higher education for engineering and gave me a more clear idea what a future job might look like.”

Dan Frank, who teaches Engineering Support Technology at Rocklin High School, had a similar experience after his students toured RobbJack in Lincoln, CA. “As a result of the tour, my students seemed more committed to the program and can see themselves becoming technicians and engineers,” said Frank. “Students really connected to individual employees who talked to them about welding, organizing the shop using 7S or programming CNC machines to create prototypes.”

Frank reported that before the tour, his students learned about 7S, a system businesses use for organizing work areas to increase efficiency and safety. “Seeing 7S methods used at RobbJack inspired students to organize our shop tools by grouping them and outlining them on a pegboard,” said Frank. “The tooling is also sorted, organized and labeled in reusable plastic pick-bins or in our tooling rack.”

Rocklin High School students were also encouraged by the career opportunities presented on the tour: “It made me think about being a machine operator and how I really do love working in the shop,” “it was just cool to see the jobs first hand,” and “this experience got me to start thinking about possible options in the engineering field.”

Tom Stargaard, who teaches Programming and Tech Core at Del Oro High School, went with his students to Progressive Technology in Rocklin, CA. “Most students had never seen a real manufacturing facility before,” said Stargaard.

“It was extremely important for them to see the level of quality and precision the real world requires. For some, it was also an eye-opener that if the company makes a mistake, it pays for it. Now that the importance of quality and precision has been demonstrated at a manufacturing facility, the students see the reason for it in the classroom,” said Stargaard.

One of Stargaard’s students also gained insight into manufacturability when he noted, “It made me think more about how just because you can design something does not mean it can be built.”

Industry connections are vital to providing instruction that prepares students for STEM careers in design and manufacturing according to the teachers. “By being in regular contact with industry, teachers learn what their future employees need to know,” said Stargaard. “Input from industry, especially the Sierra College Mechatronics advisory committee, has really shaped my curriculum in all my classes.”

Jonathan Schwartz, who teaches Math & Engineering at Colfax High School, toured RobbJack with his students. “I am developing more application-based math curriculum,” said Schwartz. “The more I go out and visit industry, the more authentic applied math lessons I am able to create.”

Teachers appreciate the support in arranging the Manufacturing Day Tours. “These tours are very valuable, but to organize them would take too much time to do on my own,” said Schwartz. “The only way trips like this can happen is through Sierra College and Carol Pepper-Kittredge’s contacts, time and financial support. I asked my students when they last went on a field trip, and they usually say third or fourth grade. If it wasn't for Sierra College’s support, they wouldn’t get this high school field trip that could impact their future education and career plans.”

Through the Sierra STEM Collaborative and Advanced Manufacturing Sector grants provided through the California Community College Chancellor’s Office, Sierra College collaborates with both industry and instructors to prepare the future workforce, explained Carol Pepper-Kittredge, CACT Director, Sierra College.

“Arranging student tours, linking teachers with businesses for externships, providing equipment for school design and engineering labs, and encouraging STEM career exploration, especially in the Advanced Manufacturing sector, are making a difference in better connecting education to employment,” said Pepper-Kittredge. “For example, a former high school student attended a tour last year, and is now at Sierra College studying Mechatronics and is working part-time for a local manufacturer.”

About Sierra College CACT
Sierra College Center for Applied Competitive Technologies (CACT) is focused on Advanced Manufacturing training and development, and is funded through the Workforce and Economic Development program of the California Community College Chancellor’s Office. Since 1992, the Sierra College CACT has provided customized training for organizations, manufacturers and technology companies throughout Northern California. Through the Sierra STEM Collaborative, Sierra College works with middle and high schools to promote STEM Education and careers. Additional information is available at http://www.sierracollegetraining.com or contact Carol Pepper-Kittredge at 916-660-7801 or cpepper-kittredge(at)sierracollege(dot)edu.

Sierra College serves 3200 square miles of Northern CA with campuses in Roseville, Rocklin, Grass Valley, and Truckee. With approximately 125 degree and certificate programs, Sierra College is ranked first in Northern California (Sacramento north) for transfers to four year Universities, offers career/technical training, and classes for upgrading job skills. Sierra graduates can be found in businesses and industries throughout the region. More information at http://www.sierracollege.edu.

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