Now in Its 5th Season, Children’s Book a Tree’s Christmas Continues to Touch Hearts of Children and Adults Alike

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The 66-page, embossed hard-cover children’s chapter book, with original artwork on the dust cover, has become a regularly featured item at Christmas tree farms and Christmas shops across America, in addition to being available at select bookstores and online at http://www.atreeschristmas.com.

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A Tree's Christmas will be a treasured gift to share with a loved one, child or adult. Its lessons of a brief life fully lived in gratitude for the wonder of creation are to be respectfully passed on to new generations.

Now in its 5th season, the ever-popular children’s Christmas book, A Tree’s Christmas, continues to be enjoyed by adults and children alike who are touched by the heartwarming story of a family’s wonder-filled Christmas – as told by the family’s magical Christmas tree.

The 66-page, embossed hard-cover children’s chapter book, with original artwork on the dust cover, has become a regularly featured item at Christmas tree farms and Christmas shops across America, in addition to being available at select bookstores and online at http://www.atreeschristmas.com.

Three years ago, the Chicago Daily Herald’s reviewer wrote that A Tree’s Christmas is sure to become a Christmas classic, and that prediction seems to be coming true. At only $9.95, A Tree’s Christmas sells several thousand copies every Christmas season.

"A Tree's Christmas will be a treasured gift to share with a loved one, child or adult. Its lessons of a brief life fully lived in gratitude for the wonder of creation are to be respectfully passed on to new generations," wrote James A. Cox, Editor in Chief at Children’s Bookwatch in The Midwest Book Review.

Opening and closing with narration by a 13-year-old girl who thinks she dreamed the story (but lets the reader decide if that’s true), the book examines themes of the cycle of life, family ties, birth, death, hardships and triumphs so appropriate for current times.

The book even addresses current issues important for youth by showing how the little Christmas tree raises its self confidence and overcomes bullying by larger trees, which eventually come to respect and love the little Christmas tree.

Lovingly taken out and laid down in the family’s snow-covered garden after Christmas, to the amazement, surprise and delight of the trees around the garden, the Christmas tree spends the night telling the other trees what it was like to be a part of the family’s Christmas celebration, to be the center of attention during the special season, and how it helped make their Christmas even better.

In one of the chapters that is already the favorite of little boys, the Christmas tree and Lucky the Irish setter tell how they managed to chase off a burglar trying to steal all of the presents under the tree. In another chapter, the tree and Lucky tell how they helped to get a fire going in the fireplace to help keep the little girl’s older sister and her newborn warm with a blizzard raging outside.

The main characters – oaks, pines, maples, dogwoods, willows, poplars and hickories – all take on the personalities of their species (as observed by the author’s 50 years in the rural South). The tree-characters interact with the little Christmas tree variously as friendly, critical, uncaring, aloof, arrogant, and finally, loving and caring.

“It’s a sweet children’s Christmas story that I’m sure young children will like,” commented reviewer Dr. Judith Briles, author of more than 20 books and board member of the Colorado Independent Publishers Association. “Adults will understand and love the circle of life theme. And, of course, the author reminds us there’s a lot more to a tree than its branches and leaves! The surprise ending will touch everyone’s hearts.”

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For a Reviewer’s Copy
Contact: Michelle Griffith
Michelle(at)clearviewcom(dot)com
813-597-8189

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Andrew Bowen, APR

Michelle M. Griffith APR
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