Flow Cytometry 2013: A Focus on Sales Growth

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London (PRWEB) November 07, 2013

Summary: This market analysis was carried out to provide business information to developers, manufacturers and suppliers in the flow cytometry field. Its findings include:

-Marketing and sales opportunities
-End-user purchasing decisions
-Market growth and shrinkage
-Innovation and new product opportunities

This study was conducted through specialist groups of experienced flow cytometry end-users and its findings are therefore based on 'real world' market data.

Market Analysis and Opportunities

A competitive market analysis of current practices and future developments across 25 key market areas in the flow cytometry field. Examples include:
-General Applications: Which general flow cytometry applications are the market leaders and what changes do end-users predict over the next three years. Which general flow cytometry techniques are growing and which are reducing?
-Clinical Applications: Which clinical flow cytometry applications are the market leaders and what changes do end-users predict over the next three years. Which clinical flow cytometry techniques are growing and which are reducing?
-Suppliers: Who are the major company suppliers in the flow cytometry field and who do flow cytometry end-users plan to purchase from over the next three years. Who are the top ten suppliers in this field, and what changes are predicted in three years from now.
-Opportunities: The findings of this study are analysed to identify opportunities to suppliers in the flow cytometry field, in the 'Market Areas' indicated below.

Overview

This market study was carried out to assist developers, manufacturers and suppliers in the flow cytometry field, in marketing and sales. It was conducted through specialist groups of experienced clinical and laboratory flow cytometry end-users, and its findings are based on 'real word' market data. By working closely with experienced end-users, we were able to identify current and emerging commercial opportunities in this market.
From its development in the 1960s, flow cytometry has evolved into a technique that is now used routinely in the clinic, as well as the research setting. The flow cytometry market is expected to grow to over $4 billion by 2015, however markets are also changing as new applications are developed.
Flow Cytometry 2013 presents the findings of a global market study of flow cytometry, involving the participation of 277 experienced end-users in this field. With a focus on market development, sales growth and commercial opportunities, the study profiled current and evolving areas of this market, as summarised below. Its findings provide a “focus on sales growth” to developers and vendors in flow cytometry, and the changes that are driving new developments in this field.

Market Areas

-Participants: Name, organisation, department, job title, and country
-Organisation type: Clinics/hospitals, Government bodies, large international companies, research institutes, small and medium sized companies, universities and veterinary centres.
-Fields: Biotechnology, chemicals, clinical/hospital, defense, diagnostics (medical), energy, environmental, food and drink, forensics, geology, government, healthcare, natural Products, pharmaceuticals, research Institutes, security, universities.
-Purpose: Purposes or reasons for using flow cytometry across 17 major fields previously indicated. As the purposes or reasons differ with field, each was considered individually and presented to appropriate study participants. As an example, the potential reasons for using flow cytometry in clinics and hospitals were clinical research, routine diagnostics, routine screening, clinical trials, treatment monitoring, diagnostics research, disease research, drug R&D, drug targets, pathology, toxicology or other [please contact Biopharm Reports if you require the full (17) industry-specific listings].
-Role description: Research scientist or research manager, or physician or clinician.
-Routine use: The use of flow cytometry for either i) routine tests (developed and validated) ii) the development or validation of flow cytometry test or iii) qualitative discovery
-Therapeutic areas: Use of flow cytometry in 20 therapeutic areas, namely, arthritis, autoimmune diseases, bone metabolism, cancer, cardiovascular, central nervous system, dentistry, dermatology, endocrine, gastrointestinal, genitourinary system, haematology, infections, inflammation, metabolic disorders, musculoskeletal disorders, nutrition, obstetrics and gynaecology, ophthalmology, pain, psychiatry, respiratory, other or not applicable.
-Main diseases: The two main diseases to which the use of flow cytometry relate.
-Study samples: Study sample types analysed by flow cytometry namely animal tissues, cerebrospinal fluid, bone marrow, human tissues, microbiological materials, pathology samples, plant materials, lymph, saliva, urine, whole blood or other.
-Current general Applications: Current use of more than 25 flow cytometry general applications including ADME Studies, toxicity studies, apoptosis, bacteria analysis, bacterial membrane potential, bead-based immunoassays, cell adherence, cell cycle, cell signalling, cell sorting, cellular kinetics, DNA and RNA content, protein expression, FRET, immunophenotyping, intracellular calcium flux, membrane asymmetry, mitochondrial membrane potential, multicolour flow cytometry, necrosis, organelle function, protein expression and localization, Rare event analysis, stem cell research, T cell immunology, transgenic products (e.g. GFP) or other
-Future general Applications: The anticipated use of more than 25 flow cytometry general applications (indicated previously) over the next three years.
-Current clinical Applications: Current use of more than 15 flow cytometry general applications, including cell counting, cell function, cell pigments, cell proliferation, cell surface antigens (e.g. CD markers), cell viability, diagnosis of haematologic malignancies, DNA ploidy, enzymatic activity, infectious diseases, intracellular antigens, minimal residual disease, monitoring AIDS patients, monitoring chemotherapy, multidrug resistance (MDR), organ or stem-cell transplantation, platelet function analysis, transfusion medicine, volume and morphology of cells or other
-Future clinical Applications: The anticipated use of more than 15 flow cytometry clinical applications (indicated previously) over the next three years.
-Main applications: The two main flow cytometry applications each ranked according to their competitive position.
-New applications: New flow cytometry applications used in the last three years.
-Emerging applications: Emerging applications that offer promise.
-Current company suppliers: Current supplies of flow cytometry systems from more than 25 companies in the flow cytometry field.
-Future company suppliers: anticipated supply of flow cytometry systems over the next three years, from over 25 companies in the flow cytometry field.
-Main flow cytometers: Flow cytometers that are used most frequently
-Strengths: The strengths of the flow cytometer systems used most frequently.
-Weaknesses: The weaknesses of flow cytometer systems used most frequently.
-Reagent or assay suppliers: The two main suppliers of your flow cytometry reagents or assays.
-Sample preparation: The two main sample preparation methods used for flow cytometry.
-Software: Preferred analysis (off-line) software used in flow cytometry.
-Challenges: The measurement or parameter that presents the greatest technical challenge (qualitatively or quantitatively) in flow cytometry, including sample type and flow cytometer used.
-Main reasons: The main technical challenges relating to the measurement or parameter referred to previously, using the flow cytometry method indicated.
-Innovation: The areas where innovation is most required (on a scale of 1-10) in flow cytometry, where the options are automation, detectors, fluidics, lasers/light sources, offline (analysis) software, online data handling, qualitative selectivity, quantitative sensitivity, reagents sample preparation or other.
-Disease biomarkers: The use of flow cytometry for the study of disease biomarkers (options yes or no).
-Main disease biomarkers: the two main disease biomarkers investigated using flow cytometry.
-Disease biomarker utility: The use of disease biomarkers in terms of their clinical utility, where the options are disease prognosis, disease susceptibility or risk, disease stage or severity, drug discovery, early detection of disease, clinical trial endpoint, guidance of treatment, response to therapy, safety or toxicity factors or other.
-Current annual budgets: Current annual financial budgets for flow cytometry, with the options of $5 million.
-Cost per sample: Current per-sample costs in flow cytometry, with options of $250.
-Current Budget breakdown: The breakdown of current annual financial budgets in nine key areas, relating to flow cytometry, namely reagents and consumables, system control software (data handling), data analysis (offline) software, flow cytometer instruments, sample preparation and related instrumentation, ancillary systems/instrumentation, general overheads, instrument servicing/repair, staff salaries or other.
-Future budgets: Anticipated financial budget changes (percentage increases or decrease, a measure of the financial growth of this field) over the next three years, relating to flow cytometry activities, with options of >-50%, -50%, -40%, -30%, -20%, -10%, -5%, 0, +5%, +10%, +20%, +30%, +40%, +50%, >+50%.
-Consumables: In terms of overall financial costs to your laboratory or clinic, the two main consumables that are directly associated with flow cytometry.
-Quality control guidelines: the main quality control guidelines or procedures in the flow cytometry field.

Executive Summary

1 Introduction

2 Study Participants

Investigated: Participants’ countries, regions, organisation types, departments and professional fields. Figures and/or tables are also presented.

2.1 This chapter
2.2 Countries
2.3 Regions
2.4 Organisation types
2.5 Departments
2.6 Fields
2.7 Discussion

Fields:
•Biotechnology
•Chemicals
•Clinical or Hospital
•Defense
•Diagnostics (Medical)
•Energy
•Environmental
•Food and Drink
•Forensics
•Geology
•Government
•Healthcare
•Natural Products
•Pharmaceuticals
•Research Institute
•Security
•University
•Other

Organisation types:
•University
•Research Institute
•Small or Medium Sized Company
•Large International Company
•Clinic or Hospital
•Government Organisation
•Veterinary Organisation
•Other

3 Purpose of Flow Cytometry

Investigated: Participants’ purpose or reasons for using flow cytometry in their specified fields (see Fields, Chapter 2). The purposes or reasons for using flow cytometry, which may be unique to particular fields, were taken into account. Example: The purpose or reasons for using flow cytometry in the “Clinical or Hospital” field were clinical research, routine diagnostics, routine screening, clinical trials, treatment monitoring, diagnostics research, disease research, drug R&D, drug targets, pathology, toxicology and other. Figures and/or tables are also presented.

3.1 This chapter
3.2 Purpose
3.3 Discussion

4 Main Activities

Investigated: The professional roles of study participants, namely as researchers or research managers, clinicians or physicians. Figures and/or tables are also presented.

4.1 This chapter
4.2 Researchers or Research Managers
4.3 Clinicians or Physicians
4.4 Discussion

5 Flow Cytometric Tests

Investigated: Participants’ use of flow cytometry in one of three areas, namely i) the running of routine cytometric tests ii) the developing of new cytometric tests or iii) qualitative (cytometric) discovery. Figures and/or tables are also presented.

5.1 This chapter
5.2 Flow cytometric tests
5.3 Discussion

6 Therapeutic Area

Investigated: The therapeutic area(s) in which study participants work, relating to their use of flow cytometry. Figures and/or tables are also presented.

6.1 This chapter
6.2 Therapeutic Areas
6.3 Discussion

Therapeutic areas:
•Arthritis
•Autoimmune Diseases
•Bone Metabolism
•Cancer
•Cardiovascular
•Central Nervous System
•Dentistry
•Dermatology
•Endocrine
•Gastrointestinal
•Genito-urinary System
•Haematology
•Infections
•Inflammation
•Metabolic Disorders
•Musculoskeletal Disorders
•Nutrition
•Obstetrics and Gynaecology
•Ophthalmology
•Pain
•Psychiatry
•Respiratory
•Skin
•Other

7 Main Diseases

Investigated: The main disease areas in which study participants work, relating to their use of flow cytometry. Figures and/or tables are also presented.

7.1 This chapter
7.2 Disease areas
7.3 Discussion

8 Samples

Investigated: The sample types analysed by study participants, using flow cytometry. Figures and/or tables are also presented.

8.1 This chapter
8.2 Samples
8.3 Discussion

Sample types:
•Animal tissues
•Cerebrospinal fluid
•Bone Marrow
•Human tissues
•Microbiological materials
•Pathology samples
•Plant materials
•Lymph
•Saliva
•Urine
•Whole blood
•Other

9 General Applications

Investigated: Participants current and anticipated future use (2012 – 2015) of flow cytometry, in respect of 26 specified general applications, or others. Figures and/or tables are also presented.

9.1 This chapter
9.2 Current general applications
9.3 Anticipated future general applications
9.4 Discussion

10 Clinical Applications

Investigated: Participants current and anticipated future use (2012 – 2015) of flow cytometry, in respect of 19 specified clinical applications, or others. Figures and/or tables are also presented.

10.1 This chapter
10.2 Current clinical applications
10.3 Anticipated future clinical applications
10.4 Discussion

11 Main applications

Investigated: Participants main flow cytometry applications. Figures and/or tables are also presented.

11.1 This chapter
11.2 Main applications
11.3 Discussion

12 New Applications

Investigated: New flow cytometry applications that study participants anticipate they will be using in the next three years. Figures and/or tables are also presented.

12.1 This chapter
12.2 New applications
12.3 Discussion

13 Emerging Applications

Investigated: Emerging flow cytometry applications that study participants believe offer promise in their field. Figures and/or tables are also presented.

13.1 This chapter
13.2 Emerging applications
13.3 Discussion

14 Suppliers

Investigated: Participants current and an anticipated future (2012 – 2015) flow cytometry suppliers or vendors, in respect of 20 specified companies, or others. Figures and/or tables are also presented.

14.1 This chapter
14.2 Current suppliers
14.3 Future suppliers
14.4 Discussion

15 Main Flow Cytometer, Strengths and Weaknesses

Investigated: Participants main flow cytometer, in terms of their most frequently used system, together with their strengths and weaknesses. Figures and/or tables are also presented.

15.1 This chapter
15.2 Main flow cytometer
15.3 Discussion

16 Reagents and Assays

Investigated: Participants two main suppliers of reagents and assays for use in flow cytometry. Figures and/or tables are also presented.

16.1 This Chapter
16.2 Reagents and assays
16.3 Discussion

17 Sample Preparation

Investigated: Sample preparation methods used by participants, for flow cytometry studies. Figures and/or tables are also presented.

17.1 This Chapter
17.2 Sample Preparation
17.3 Discussion

18 Software

Investigated: Participants use of data analysis (offline) software, for flow cytometry studies. Figures and/or tables are also presented.

18.1 This Chapter
18.2 Software
18.3 Discussion

19 Challenges

Investigated: The measurements or parameters that present the greatest technical challenge to study participants, relating to their use of flow cytometry. The parameter, sample type (matrix) and cytometer used were indicated, together with the main underlying reasons. Figures and/or tables are also presented.

19.1 This chapter
19.2 Parameters
19.3 Sample type (matrix)
19.4 Flow cytometer
19.5 Reasons
19.6 Discussion

20 Innovation

Investigated: Participants views on areas of required innovation (ranked on a scale of 1 to 10, where 1 is the least important and 10 is the most important), in respect of 10 specified areas, or others. Figures and/or tables are also presented.

20.1 This chapter
20.2 Innovation
20.3 Discussion

21 Disease Biomarkers

Investigated: Participants two main biomarkers investigated or measured using flow cytometry and their applications in terms of nine clinical utilities. Figures and/or tables are also presented.

21.1 This chapter
21.2 Biomarkers
21.3 Clinical utility
21.4 Discussion

22 Flow Cytometry Expenditure and Budgets

Investigated: Financial expenditure and budgets relating to the current and future use of flow cytometry, including end-users’ current annual budgets across specified ranges (see Current Annual financial budgets), the average flow cytometry analysis costs/sample across specified ranges (see Flow Cytometry Costs per Sample), budget breakdown across nine specified areas (see Budget Breakdown Areas) and overall annual financial budget for flow cytometry (either increasing or decreasing in % terms), over the next three years (see Future Budget Changes). Figures and/or tables are also presented.

22.1 This chapter
22.2 Annual budgets
22.3 Costs per sample
22.4 Budget breakdown
22.5 Future budget
22.6 Discussion

Budget breakdown Areas

•Reagents and consumables
•System control (data handling) software
•Data analysis (offline) software
•Flow cytometer instruments
•Sample preparation and related instrumentation
•Ancillary systems/instrumentation
•General overheads
•Instrument servicing/repair
•Staff salaries
•Other

23 Consumables

Investigated: Participants two main consumables in terms of costs, that are directly associated with their use of flow cytometry. Figures and/or tables are also presented.

23.1 This Chapter
23.2 Consumables
23.3 Discussion

24 Quality Control

Investigated: Quality control systems or procedures adhered to in the use of flow cytometry. Figures and/or tables are also presented.

24.1 This chapter
24.2 Quality control
24.3 Discussion

Figures and Tables

Figure 2.1 Countries of individuals who participated in FC 2012
Figure 2.2 Global regions of individuals who participated in FC 2012.
Figure 2.3 Organisation types of individuals who participated in FC 2012
Figure 2.4 Fields of individuals who participated in FC 2012
Table 2.1 Countries of individuals who participated in FC 2012
Table 2.2 Global regions of individuals who participated in FC 2012
Table 2.3 Organisation types of individuals who participated in FC 2012
Figure 3.1 Top ten reasons for using FC in the biotechnology industry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012
Figure 3.2 Top ten reasons for using FC in clinics or hospitals, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012
Figure 3.3 Top ten reasons for using FC in the energy industry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012
Figure 3.4 Top ten reasons for using FC in diagnostics (medical), indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012
Figure 3.5 Top ten reasons for using FC in the environmental industry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012
Figure 3.6 Top ten reasons for using FC in the food and drink industry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012
Figure 3.7 Top ten reasons for using FC in the Government organisations, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012
Figure 3.8 Top ten reasons for using FC in the healthcare industry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012
Figure 3.9 Top ten reasons for using FC in the natural products industry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012
Figure 3.10 Top ten reasons for using FC in the pharmaceutical industry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012
Figure 3.11 Top ten reasons for using FC in research institutes, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012
Figure 3.12 Top ten reasons for using FC in universities, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Figure 4.1 Main activities of individuals using flow cytometry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Figure 5.1 General flow cytometry tests carried out by individuals using flow cytometry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Figure 6.1 Top ten therapeutic areas relating to the use of flow cytometry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Table 6.1 Therapeutic areas relating to the use of flow cytometry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Figure 7.1 Top ten main diseases relating to the use of flow cytometry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Table 7.1 Main diseases relating to the use of flow cytometry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Figure 8.1 Top ten sample types relating to the use of flow cytometry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Table 8.1 Sample types relating to the use of flow cytometry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Figure 9.1 Top ten general applications of flow cytometry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Table 9.1 General applications of flow cytometry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Figure 9.2 Top ten future (2012 - 2015) general applications of flow cytometry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Table 9.2 Future (2012 - 2015) general applications of flow cytometry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Figure 10.1 Top ten clinical applications of flow cytometry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Table 10.1 Clinical applications of flow cytometry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Figure 10.2 Top ten future (2012 - 2015) clinical applications of flow cytometry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Table 10.2 Future (2012 - 2015) clinical applications of flow cytometry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Figure 11.1 Top ten main applications in flow cytometry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Table 11.1 Main applications in flow cytometry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Figure 12.1 Top ten new applications in flow cytometry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Table 12.1 New applications in flow cytometry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Figure 13.1 Top ten emerging applications in flow cytometry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Table 13.1 Emerging applications in flow cytometry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Figure 14.1 Top ten suppliers of flow cytometry systems, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Table 14.1 Suppliers of flow cytometry systems, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Figure 14.1 Top ten future (2012 - 2015) suppliers of flow cytometry systems, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Table 14.1 Future (2012 - 2015) suppliers of flow cytometry systems, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Figure 15.1 Top ten main flow cytometers, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Table 15.1 Main flow cytometers, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Figure 15.2 Top ten strengths of main flow cytometers, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Table 15.2 Strengths of main flow cytometers, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Figure 15.3 Top ten weaknesses of main flow cytometers, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Table 15.3 Weaknesses of main flow cytometers, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Figure 16.1 Top ten reagents and assays used in flow cytometry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Table 16.1 Reagents and assays used in flow cytometry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Figure 17.1 Top ten sample preparation methods used in flow cytometry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Table 17.1 Sample preparation methods used in flow cytometry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Figure 18.1 Top ten offline software used in flow cytometry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Table 18.1 Offline software used in flow cytometry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Figure 19.1 Top ten technical challenges in flow cytometry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Table 19.1 Technical challenges used in flow cytometry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Figure 19.2 Top ten sample types associated with technical challenges in flow cytometry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Table 19.2 Sample types associated with challenges in flow cytometry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Figure 19.3 Top ten flow cytometers associated with technical challenges in flow cytometry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Table 19.3 Flow cytometers associated with challenges in flow cytometry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Figure 20.1 Top five areas of required innovation in flow cytometry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Table 20.1 Areas of required innovation in flow cytometry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Figure 21.1 Top ten disease biomarkers studied using flow cytometry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Table 21.1 Disease biomarkers studied using flow cytometry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Figure 21.2 Top five disease biomarker clinical utilities in flow cytometry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Table 21.2 Disease biomarkers clinical utilities in flow cytometry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Figure 22.1 Annual budgets for the use of flow cytometry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Figure 22.2 Average costs/per sample using flow cytometry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Figure 22.3 Budget breakdown in nine key areas in flow cytometry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Figure 22.4 Future budget changes (increases or decreases) relating to the use of flow cytometry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Figure 23.1 Top ten consumables used in flow cytometry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Table 23.2 Consumables used in flow cytometry, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Figure 24.1 Top ten quality control systems or procedures followed by flow cytometry users, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

Table 24.1 Quality control systems or procedures followed by flow cytometry users, indicated by individuals who participated in FC 2012

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Flow Cytometry 2013: A Focus on Sales Growth

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For more information:
Sarah Smith
Research Advisor at Reportbuyer.com
Email: query@reportbuyer.com
Tel: +44 208 816 85 48
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  • Sarah Smith
    Research Advisor at Reportbuyer.com
    +44 208 816 85 48
    Email