Study: Wealth Plays Role in Use of Long-Acting Family Planning Methods

Although more women globally are gaining access to family planning methods, the uptake of long-acting and permanent methods of contraception is still low in many developing nations, according to new research from Abt Associates presented today during the International Conference on Family Planning.

  • Share on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Share on LinkedInEmail a friendRepost This

Addis Ababa, Ethiopia (PRWEB) November 13, 2013

Wealthy women in Africa, Asia and Latin America are more likely than poor women to use long-acting family planning methods, with the exception of women in South Asia, according to new research from Abt Associates. Although more women globally are gaining access to family planning methods, the uptake of long-acting and permanent methods of contraception is still low in many developing nations.

The research, presented during the International Conference on Family Planning in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, includes survey data from women in 14 countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America. Even after taking into account the ways that a woman’s age, number of children and level of education might affect her use of contraception, wealth continues to play a significant role in women’s using long-acting and permanent methods of contraception (LAPMs). For women in South Asian countries, poorer women were more likely than wealthier women to use these family planning methods.

“This study shows that we must identify and address the barriers that poor women face in getting access to long-acting methods of contraception,” said James Gribble, an expert in family planning at Abt Associates who co-authored the study with Jorge Ugaz and Minki Chatterji of Abt. “While more women are gaining access to family planning methods around the world, now is the time for full access and full choice when it comes to offering this important option in family planning.”

Researchers also examined the role of wealth in predicting whether a woman received LAPMs through for-profit private or public facilities. Among those who use long-acting and permanent methods of family planning, wealthy women were more likely to obtain LAPMs through the private sector. However, in 4 of 14 countries, between one quarter and one half of the poorest women received LAPMs from the private sector.

More development and testing of programs that improve the affordability of LAPMs is needed, the researchers conclude. The research was conducted by the Strengthening Health Outcomes through the Private Sector (SHOPS) project, funded by the United States Agency for International Development.

For a complete list of research from Abt Associates presented during the International Conference on Family Planning, please visit: http://abtassociates.com/ICFP2013.aspx.

About Abt Associates

Abt Associates is a mission-driven, global leader in research and program implementation in the fields of health, social and environmental policy, and international development. Known for its rigorous approach to solving complex challenges, Abt Associates is regularly ranked as one of the top 20 global research firms and one of the top 40 international development innovators. The company has multiple offices in the U.S. and program offices in more than 40 countries. http://www.abtassociates.com


Contact

  • Caroline Broder
    Abt Associates
    +1 301-347-5792
    Email