Eye Strain and Winter Dry Eye Can Increase Stress Reports Water and Eye Researcher

Tips on How to Relieve Stress by Drinking More Water and Taking Care of Eyes from Water and Eye Researcher Sharon Kleyne, Founder of Bio Logic Aqua Research

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Grants Pass, OR (PRWEB) November 14, 2013

The presence of eye strain and dry, irritated eyes can increase one’s feelings of stress and anxiety, reports water and eye researcher Sharon Kleyne. In addition, according to Kleyne, the relationship between stress and eyes can become a vicious circle because too much stress can also cause the tear film in the eyes to lose water and become dehydrated.

Sharon Kleyne is Founder of Bio Logic Aqua Research, a fresh water and health research, education and product development center. Nature’s Tears® EyeMist®, the company’s global signature product, provides a soothing mist of 100% fresh water vapor to instantly soothe dry and chapped skin. Kleyne also hosts the globally syndicated Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water® radio show on VoiceAmerica and Apple iTunes.

The eye/stress connection, according to Kleyne, has to do with the fact that the eyes are very close to the brain and the two are “hard-wired” together. Any trauma to the brain will affect the eyes and vice-versa. Many emotions affect the eyes, including sadness, joy, depression and stress. Kleyne’s research has discovered that prisoners, and people who are emotionally unstable, tend to have more vision problems than those who are naturally calm and collected.

Dry eye complaints tend to be worse in winter because the atmosphere cannot hold as much airborne water vapor at colder temperatures, which causes water in the eyes’ tear film to evaporate at a faster rate. Indoor air also tends to have a lower water vapor content. The loss of tear film moisture to evaporation triggers numerous hormonal responses in the eyes, including an inflammatory reaction and a threat alert.    

To avoid the worsening of stress by the eyes, or a worsening of eye problems because of stress, Kleyne offers two obvious suggestions. The first is to take care of your vision and the second is to either avoid or learn to cope with stressful situations. Taking care of yourself emotionally, Kleyne emphasizes, is always good advice for staying healthy and is at least as important as taking care of yourself physically and nutritionally.

To avoid dry eyes, eye strain and associated stress, Kleyne recommends drinking at least eight full glasses of water each day, in addition to all other fluid intake: If you start to feel stressed, or your eyes begin to feel uncomfortable, a soothing, all-natural, pH balanced fresh water mist such as Nature’s Tears® EyeMist® will quickly supplement the tear film’s water content, alleviate tear film dehydration and relieve dry eye complaints.


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  • Mikaylah Roggasch
    Bio Logic Aqua Research-Rogue Media
    +1 (800) 367-6478
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