Tylenol Liver Damage Allegations Lawyer: Resource4thePeople Warns of Dangers of Mixing Alcohol and Acetaminophens

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Dosage errors are among most serious risks alleged in federal consolidated Tylenol liver damage allegation lawsuits. Resource4thePeople maintains offers of free consultations to consumers over allegations that Tylenol and other acetaminophens may cause liver damage.

http://www.resource4thepeople.com/defectivedrugs/acetaminophen.html

In its latest update to consumers affected by litigation involving allegations that Tylenol products and other acetaminophens may cause liver damage Resource4thePeople is warning today of the dangers of dosage errors and alcohol use combined with these medications.

“The Food and Drug Administration and Tylenol have detailed how these factors can lead to serious health problems, particularly as individuals age," said Resource4thePeople. "Many consumers may not be aware that there have been recent changes in dosage instructions involving Tylenol and other acetaminophens that consumers should familiarize themselves with, particularly when alcohol is involved,” said Resource4thePeople.

“There is also a multidistrict litigation* in the federal court system involving Tylenol lawsuits from across the country that have been grouped together because they contain similar allegations that the medications can cause life-threatening liver damage.”

Resource4thePeople’s national network of attorneys is continuing to offer free consultations to consumers who may be seeking legal options to seek compensation for medical expenses, pain and suffering and other expenses that involve allegations similar to those assigned to a judge in U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.

The judge, U.S. District Court Judge Lawrence F. Stengel, has issued a case management order** in the litigation outlining the selection process for bellwether trials in 2014 that will be chosen from the lawsuits assigned to him.

Resource4thePeople notes that Tylenol, on its web site***specifically warns that Tylenol contains acetaminophen and alerts consumers that severe liver damage may occur if you take "3 or more alcoholic drinks every day while using this product."

The same warning also was posted**** by the U.S. Food and Drug Agency on its web site in addition to details about dosage dangers:

"Acetaminophen is the generic name of a drug found in many common brand name OTC products such as Tylenol, as well as prescription products such as Vicodin and Percocet. Acetaminophen is an important drug, and its effectiveness in relieving pain and fever is widely known. This drug is generally considered safe when used according to the directions on its labeling. But taking more than the recommended amount can cause liver damage, ranging from abnormalities in liver function blood tests, to acute liver failure, and even death."

Resource4thePeople has found in reviewing the inquiries from consumers about the possibility of suffering liver damage from the use of Tylenol products that it is clear that many consumers were not aware of the dangers caused by combining alcohol and acetaminophen," said Resource4thePeople.

"Therefore, we are urging all consumers to completely familiarize themselves with the dosage instructions and warnings about interactions involving alcohol that can have extreme, life-threatening consequences."

Most of the lawsuits alleging links between Tylenol and severe liver damage were filed after a June 24, 2009 safety communication (updated on Nov, 15, 2013)**** was issued by the Food and Drug Administration warning that acetaminophen, when taken in doses stronger than the recommended amount, can cause life-threatening health problems.

The FDA said it issued the warning after an advisory committee of medical experts and physicians met to address the problem of liver injury related to the use of acetaminophen in both over-the-counter (OTC) and prescription products.

The FDA said acetaminophen is the generic name of a drug found in many common brand name OTC products such as Tylenol, as well as prescription products such as Vicodin and Percocet.

“Acetaminophen is an important drug, and its effectiveness in relieving pain and fever is widely known,” said the FDA. “This drug is generally considered safe when used according to the directions on its labeling. But taking more than the recommended amount can cause liver damage, ranging from abnormalities in liver function blood tests, to acute liver failure, and even death.”

Resource4thePeople notes that the allegations contained in the consolidated federal lawsuits claiming that the use of Tylenol products may cause liver damage are similar to the warning raised in the FDA health advisory.

"Many consumers are unaware of the possible side effects from the use of the popular pain-killer Tylenol, as evidenced by the allegations made in a multidistrict litigation now pending in federal court," said Resource4thePeople.

Meanwhile, the manufacturer’s web site***** has been updated to reflect the possibility that consumers who have been using the popular Tylenol line of painkillers may have been exposed to the possibility of overdoses that could have led to liver damage.

There are also new dosage instructions on the site in which the manufacturers say they are “taking new steps to reduce the potential for accidental overdose of acetaminophen—the active ingredient in TYLENOL® products — and to help ensure that people who use TYLENOL® Brand, and other products containing acetaminophen, use them appropriately.”

On its web site, Tylenol is making the following dosage recommendation changes:

  •     Reducing the maximum daily dose from 8 pills (4,000 mg) per day to 6 pills (3,000 mg) per day
  •     Changing the dosing interval from every 4-6 hours to every 6 hours.

Resource4thePeople is encouraging all consumers who may be considering using Tylenol or any other acetaminophen-based pain killer to strictly follow dosing recommendations and familiarize themselves with any dangerous side effects these medications may cause.

The web site posting also contains the following warning:

“Some people accidentally exceed the recommended dose when taking multiple products at the same time, often without realizing they contain acetaminophen or by not reading and following the dosing instructions. Acetaminophen –the active ingredient in TYLENOL® products–is safe when used as directed, but when taken in overdose amounts, it can cause liver damage.”

The new dosage instructions are part of a nationwide campaign the popular painkiller's manufacturer has undertaken to inform consumers that taking too much of the medication can cause liver damage problems that may prove fatal.

Sources:
*MDL2436 In Re: Tylenol (Acetaminophen) Marketing, Sales Practices and Products Liability Litigation, U.S. District Court, Eastern District of Pennsylvania
**http://www.paed.uscourts.gov/documents/MDL/MDL2436/CMO15.pdf
***http://www.tylenol.com/head-body/extra-strength-tylenol
****http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm168830.htm
*****http://getreliefresponsibly.com/instructions/instructions.php

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