Women Need Further Educating Into Extent of Digital Manipulation of Models in Mags, New Look Survey Finds

A study on behalf of New Look shows that women still need plenty of educating into the extent of digital manipulation in images of models, and the problems this can cause.

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"9 in 10 people say they would like to see a broader range of body shapes shown in advertising and the media." - Jo Swinson MP

London (PRWEB UK) 26 November 2013

A One Poll survey was commissioned to look into women’s body confidence. It suggests that there is still a long way to go into educating women about how models and celebs in fashion magazines have had their images digitally enhanced.

The study, on behalf of New Look, was commissioned this month as part of an ongoing campaign to encourage body confidence in women. The online survey asked 2,000 women aged between 18 and 65 to answer various questions.

It found a number of disconcerting truths. For instance, 15% of the 18-24 year old women surveyed believe the images of celebs and models they see in magazines accurately reflect what the models look like in reality. This is particularly concerning after all the effort that has been made to educate women about the ubiquity of Photoshop in fashion mags.

The study found that over a third of UK women (from 2,000 respondents) are unconfident to extremely unconfident about their body. 24% also said they were unconfident about their body when going out with their girl friends, which should surely be a time for letting off steam and feeling relaxed.

33% of the women polled also feel the body they aspire towards is not possible for them to achieve.

Jo Swinson MP, junior Equalities Minister, has campaigned tirelessly over the past couple of years to highlight the negative effects the media can have on body image. She has said: “The images we see in the world of fashion are all pretty much the same – it’s as if there is only one way of being beautiful”.

She continues that: “9 in 10 people say they would like to see a broader range of body shapes shown in advertising and the media”.

Big steps have been taken to combat body image issues, with Debenhams unveiling size 16 mannequins, Dove heavily promoting their Campaign for Real Beauty and the YMCA campaigning with the government to tackle societies’ obsession with body image ideals.

But there is much more to be done.

As Jo Swinson MP says: “There is nothing wrong with taking pride in your appearance and wanting to look good. But it’s become so normal for people to worry about what they look like that it’s easy for people to ignore the real and damaging impact it can have.”

Michael Edmondstone
Forward3D
(+44) 020 3476 3722


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