Beloved Opera Singer Returns to Public Eye After Bell’s Palsy Curtailed Her Career

Babak Azizzadeh, MD, FACS, Director of the Facial Paralysis Institute in Los Angeles, discusses Elinor Ross’s battle with Bell’s palsy that forced her retirement years ago.

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Babak Azizzadeh MD
Each person is different. I do a comprehensive evaluation of each individual’s condition to determine, first, if they are a candidate for surgery, then, which technique will most appropriately restore facial animation.

Beverly Hills, CA (PRWEB) December 10, 2013

An article published October 13, 2013 on SiLive.com chronicles the opera career of Elinor Ross who had to retire in 1979 when she developed Bell’s palsy. Bell’s palsy is a condition affecting the facial nerve that causes asymmetrical facial paralysis. Babak Azizzadeh, MD, FACS, is the Director of the Facial Paralysis Institute in Los Angeles and a Bell’s palsy expert who says, unfortunately, Ross experienced a bad case.

“Generally, patients with Bell’s palsy are given a high dose of anti-viral and steroidal medications right away, and the facial paralysis is temporary. However, in some cases, like that of Ms. Ross, the paralysis is permanent and requires surgical treatment,” explained Dr. Azizzadeh.

Elinor Ross underwent surgery for Bell’s palsy facial paralysis and was able to sing once again, but she never did return to singing at the opera. When the facial paralysis brought on by Bell’s palsy persists for 2 years or more, surgical treatment may be an option.

“Botox is the most common treatment for Bell’s palsy, as it can improve the patient’s appearance and relax synkinetic muscles while the patient recovers. When the paralysis lasts more than 2 years, however, it may be time to consider facial reanimation surgery,” said Dr. Azizzadeh.

Dr. Babak Azizzadeh is a facial paralysis expert in Los Angeles who is known for his innovative surgical techniques. Depending on the individual patient’s condition, there are a variety of surgeries that may effectively restore facial movement in patients living with permanent facial paralysis.

“Each person is different. I do a comprehensive evaluation of each individual’s condition to determine, first, if they are a candidate for surgery, then, which technique will most appropriately restore facial animation. Oftentimes, it is a combination of procedures that produces the best aesthetic result,” explained Dr. Azizzadeh.

Since his extensive and prestigious training at Harvard Medical School, Dr. Azizzadeh has helped hundreds of people with varying degrees of facial paralysis. Dr. Azizzadeh is the director of the Facial Paralysis Institute and one of the leading figures in the field of Facial Nerve Paralysis. Dr. Azizzadeh has been recognized for his work on several occasions, and has appeared on the Oprah Winfrey Show and countless other media outlets.

Dr. Azizzadeh is trained in Facial Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery, as well as Head & Neck Surgery, giving him a distinctive insight into facial nerve function and facial aesthetics. Dr. Azizzadeh also has extensive training in microsurgical facial reconstruction, which is often required for the treatment of people who are born with facial paralysis.

For more information on Bell’s palsy treatment, contact the Facial Paralysis Institute at (310) 657-2203.


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