Yourwellness Magazine Outlines Steps to Take During a Divorce

With Nigella Lawson potentially going on the Oprah Winfrey show to talk about her divorce, Yourwellness Magazine outlined what to do when a partner wants a divorce.

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London, UK (PRWEB UK) 21 December 2013

Nigella Lawson could be set to spill the beans on her sudden divorce from Charles Saatchi, The Express reported December 2nd. The article, “Nigella Lawson considers tell-all interview with Oprah Winfrey,” explained that Lawson is said to be considering a tell all interview with Oprah Winfrey, as she is sure that she will not be forced to divulge any particular details about the end of her ten-year marriage to art tycoon Charles. A source commented, ‘Oprah is the place to go if you want to give an interview on a difficult topic and don’t want to be grilled.’ (http://www.express.co.uk/news/showbiz/446353/Nigella-Lawson-may-talk-about-Charles-Saatchi-divorce-in-Oprah-Winfrey-interview)

With this in mind, Yourwellness Magazine outlined what to do when a partner wants a divorce. Yourwellness Magazine noted, ‘When your spouse tells you they want a divorce, can anything be more damaging to your emotional health? Not only do you have to cope with the fact that the person you thought you’d spend your life with no longer feels the same; you also have a long stretch of difficult situations ahead of you. Therefore, it’s vital that you start actively protecting your wellbeing from the very beginning…You must also realise that your spouse hasn’t just done this on a whim; he or she has been thinking about divorce for a while, and so has probably thought about what happens next. This means you have to get proactive.’ (http://www.yourwellness.com/2013/11/partner-wants-divorce/#sthash.voOGpotO.dpuf)

Yourwellness Magazine outlined four steps to take when going through a divorce:

1. Gather support. Choose one or two logical people to help go through legal jargon, as well as a secondary support system of immediate family, and closest friends.
2. Get the right mentality. If the marriage ended on good terms, an amicable attitude is needed. If, however, the split was unexpected or there was abuse or infidelity involved, chances are the mentality of a fighter will be needed.
3. Choose a lawyer. Again, if this is an amicable divorce with no children involved, a mediator may do fine. If not, spouses should not share the same lawyer, but get one each. Go in to meetings with a list of precise questions.
4. Sort out finances. Often in marriages one partner makes more money or takes care of accounts, budgeting etc. so the spouse who didn’t do that has a lot to catch up on.

To find out more, visit the gateway to living well at http://www.yourwellness.com.


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