Study: Latent Viruses Change Cells in the Human Body; the Study Supports the Link between Latent Viruses and Disease

A study published on November 21, 2013 in the medical journal Viruses showed that “HCMV latency is a highly active process …which orchestrate(s) major changes in the latently infected cell (1).” In light of this study, The Center for the Biology of Chronic Disease (CBCD) recommends reading Dr. Polansky’s book on microcompetition again.

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believe that doctors need to take the time to read the latest research on viral latency. Latent viruses are active, and can be dangerous. - Gregg Bennett, CBCD

Rochester, NY (PRWEB) December 08, 2013

The CBCD believes that those scientists, who view latent viruses as harmless, are wrong. One can find an example of such a view in a study published as recent as 2012 in the journal of Medical Microbiology and Immunology. Researchers wrote that the Human Cytomegalovirus (CMV), “stays for the lifetime of the host in a non-infectious, replicatively dormant state known as 'viral latency' (2).” Notice that the researchers equate ‘dormancy’ with ‘latency.’ Even the CDC considers the two as one and the same. On its website published on May 16. 2006, the CDC stated that “EBV remains dormant or latent in a few cells…” (2). Note that the website uses the word ‘or’, meaning according to the CDC, ‘dormant’ and ‘latent’ are interchangeable.

This is a misconception.

There is much research, which shows that latent viruses are not dormant. In fact, as a new study found, “…advances in techniques to study global changes in gene expression have begun to show that HCMV latency is a highly active process which involves expression of specific latency-associated viral gene products which orchestrate major changes in the latently infected cell (1).” In addition, “as techniques for studying HCMV at a molecular level have become increasingly powerful, it is now emerging that latent HCMV infection profoundly modulates the latently infected cell and the surrounding cellular environment (1).”

In particular, researchers wrote that all of the herpes viruses, which are responsible for much of the viral disease burden in humans, affect the body while latent. Research shows the existence of “a common unifying theme in the biology of herpesvirus latency and reactivation (1).”

Thus, all herpes viruses, including the Human Cytomegalovirus (CMV), oral herpes (HSV-1), genital herpes (HSV-2), and the Epstein Barr Virus (EBV), have a similar impact on the body, specifically during latency. They all replicate, and express proteins.

Another study showed that human ganglia (a mass of nerve cells), which were infected with the latent Varicella Zoster Virus, showed multiple VZV transcripts. “RT-PCR and in situ hybridization studies have identified multiple VZV transcripts in latently infected human ganglia. State-of-the-art multiplex PCR technology, capable of detecting all 68 annotated VZV gene transcripts, revealed transcription of at least 12 VZV genes during latency…(3).” This is according to a study published on September 14, 2013 in the journal, Viruses.

“We believe that doctors need to take the time to read the latest research on viral latency. Latent viruses are active, and can be dangerous. One great source of information on this subject is “Microcompetition with Foreign DNA and the Origin of Chronic Disease,” a book by Dr. Hanan Polansky, which includes an explanation on how latent viruses cause most major diseases.” – Greg Bennett, CBCD

The following is a simplified explanation of that theory. Dr. Hanan Polansky discovered that foreign DNA fragments, called N-boxes, cause most major diseases. When the foreign N-boxes belong to a virus, microcompetition between the viral DNA and the human DNA can lead to disease even when the virus is latent or the viral DNA is broken into pieces and cannot express proteins.

To learn more about Dr. Hanan Polansky’s research and the Theory of Microcompetition with Foreign DNA, visit: http://www.cbcd.net

References:

(1)    Human Cytomegalovirus Manipulation of Latently Infected Cells. Published on November 21, 2013.
        http://www.mdpi.com/1999-4915/5/11/2803

(2)    Viral latency drives 'memory inflation': a unifying hypothesis linking two hallmarks of cytomegalovirus infection. Published in November, 2012.
             http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22991040

(3)    Varicella zoster virus (VZV)-human neuron interaction. Published on September 4, 2013.
         http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24008377

The CBCD is a research center recognized by the IRS as a 501(c)(3) non-for-profit organization. The mission of the CBCD is to advance the research on the biology of chronic diseases, and to accelerate the discovery of treatments.

The CBCD published the “Purple” book by Dr. Hanan Polansky. The book presents Dr. Polansky’s highly acclaimed scientific theory on the relationship between foreign DNA and the onset of chronic diseases. Dr. Polansky’s book is available as a free download from the CBCD website.


Contact

  • Hanan Polansky
    Center for the Biology of Chronic Disease (CBCD)
    +1 (585) 250-9999
    Email