Aire Serv® Wants You to be Aware of Carbon Monoxide: Understand Symptoms, Causes and Prevention

Aire Serv wants you to understand the risks and causes of carbon monoxide and to be safe over the winter months.

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WACO, Texas (PRWEB) December 29, 2013

If you find yourself using a wood stove, space heater or gas-powered fireplace this winter remember that the risk of carbon monoxide poisoning is a real concern. Aire Serv wants you to understand the risks and causes of carbon monoxide and to be safe over the winter months.

Carbon monoxide is hard to detect because it is colorless, tasteless and odorless which makes it extremely dangerous. It is produced by incomplete combustion of carbon containing materials. Carbon monoxide has been given the name the “silent killer” because of its characteristics.

Because its symptoms are much like that of any other form of sickness, carbon monoxide posses a threat to humans and animals. Victims of carbon monoxide poisoning often suffer from headaches, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, fatigue and weakness. People who suffer from carbon monoxide poisoning may confuse it with a sickness such as food poisoning.    

When in your home be aware of carbon monoxide producers. Open flames, space heaters, water heaters, wood burning stoves and gas-powered fire places are all things that can produce carbon monoxide. Make sure your home is properly ventilated with fresh air if you are going to use anything that can produce carbon monoxide.

Your vehicle is a large producer of carbon monoxide. Never leave your car running in a closed garage or space. If you are going to leave your car running in the garage make sure that the garage door is open.

The best way to be prepared for carbon monoxide is to install a carbon monoxide detector in your home. If you already have one installed in your home be sure to check the batteries or power source to ensure it is operating properly.

If you are in your home and you begin to feel dizzy, nauseated or exhausted open windows and step outside to get fresh oxygen. Be sure to contact a service professional to check for carbon monoxide in your home before reentering.


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