Plastic Surgery – South Koreans Invest in their Futures with Cosmetic Procedures

A recent The Atlantic article examines the reasons behind the rising popularity of plastic surgery in South Korea. Dr. Simon Ourian of Epione Beverly Hills says that cultural norms appear to drive the desire of South Korean youth to plastic surgery.

Los Angeles, California (PRWEB) July 12, 2013

According to a June 27, 2013 article from The Atlantic, titled “South Korean High Schoolers Get Plastic Surgery for Graduation,” physical beauty is of primary importance in Korean society and each person is encouraged to strive for certain ideals. There is no stigma attached to undergoing plastic surgery. In fact, around 20% of women in the country have undergone a procedure; many while still in their teens (Go to
goo.gl/X7cPO).

“I work in Beverly Hills where it’s not uncommon for a teenager to get a nose job,” says Dr. Ourian, Medical Director. “But I don’t believe it’s common here for a teenager to want to restructure her face to conform to a certain celebrity-driven image.”

According to the report, in South Korean schools it is common to find large mirrors in every hallway and scales along the corridors for the students to weigh themselves. Students, both male and female, use the mirrors to examine their appearance quite frequently. Children in Korea are raised to be high achievers and the competition for various jobs is fierce. When all the applicants have stellar resumes, the choice often boils down to outward appearance.

The report goes on to say that Korean music or K-Pop churns out an army of idols every year. There are dozens of extremely popular boy bands and all-girl groups in the country, all vying for the attention of a fickle-minded and increasingly younger fandom. Each idol exudes a unique style, which fans try to copy for themselves, starting from the hair all the way to their clothes. Some take things a bit further, bringing a picture of their favorite celebrity to cosmetic surgery clinics for the reference of their doctors.

“All these might seem odd to those of us in the West who are taught that the acceptance of one's self is a far greater ideal than the need to please others,” says Dr. Ourian. “To Koreans, however, plastic surgery is just a practical tool towards upwards social mobility. Ultimately, the economic benefits of being beautiful are too tempting to ignore, and so they go under the knife to invest in their future.”

Dr. Ourian has been a pioneer in laser technology and non-invasive aesthetic procedures including Restylane, Juvéderm, Radiesse and Sculptra. These treatments are used for the correction or reversal of a variety of conditions such as acne, acne scars, skin discoloration, wrinkles, stretch marks, varicose veins, cellulite, and others. More information about the culture of plastic surgery in South Korea can be found on Epione’s website.


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