Hidden Hearing Respond to Research Which Reveals Brainwaves Can Influence Hearing Abilities

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Leaders in private hearing healthcare, Hidden Hearing, have responded to new research which identifies hearing ability depends on the exact timing of our brain’s rhythms.

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Researchers Molly Henry and Jonas Obleser from the Max Planck Institute in Germany found that the rhythms in the environment, rhythms in the brain and behaviour are all linked together and influence one another.

German researchers have discovered that hearing depends on the exact timing of the brain’s rhythms. This means that brains, sound and behaviour are connected and coupled and that brain activity influences the way we listen reports Hear It on July 4.

Researchers Molly Henry and Jonas Obleser from the Max Planck Institute in Germany found that the rhythms in the environment, rhythms in the brain and behaviour are all linked together and influence one another.

The researchers behind the study are hoping to be able to use the brain’s coupling to its acoustic environment as a new measure to study the problems of listeners with hearing loss or people who stutter.

A spokesperson from Hidden Hearing said:

“Understanding how the brain processes sounds is incredibly important in understanding how this affects hearing and what environments will help and hinder hearing. Knowing how hearing works allows for a greater understanding of how the ear works and how hearing loss can be treated the most effectively.”

With more than 40 years’ experience in treating hearing loss, Hidden Hearing is entrusted with the care of more than 100,000 people each year. The firm has 84 hearing centres across the UK, all catering for a range of needs and budgets. Specialising in hearing tests and hearing aids, the company also offer a variety of hearing aid accessories and in 2005, became the first dedicated hearing retailer to be recognised as an Investor in People.

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