Construction Defect Center Now Urges Homeowners Who Had A Fire Caused By A Corrugated Stainless Steel Tubing (CSST) Gas Leak Caused By A Thunderstorm To Call Them

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The Construction Defect Center is now urging homeowners who had a fire after a corrugated stainless steel tube failure, because of a lightning strike to contact them immediately, because it is now well documented there is a risk of a fire caused by a leak from CSST natural gas tubes, should a home, or building suffer an electrical strike during an electrical storm, and the group wants to emphasize this is an issue nationwide initiative. For more information about corrugated stainless steel tubes, also known as CSST and the potential for failures, and fire hazards homeowners are welcome to contact the Construction Defect Center anytime at 866-714-6466. http://ConstructionDefectCenter.Com

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The Construction Defect Center is urging homeowners who had a home fire to contact them immediately, if it has been determined the home's fire was caused by a failure of corrugated stainless steel tubing (CSST), as a result of a lightning strike

The Construction Defect Center is urging homeowners who had a home fire to contact them immediately, if it has been determined the home's fire was caused by a failure of corrugated stainless steel tubing (CSST), as a result of a lightning strike to the home during an electrical storm.

On July 8th 2012 the Minnesota Department of Public Safety issued the following statement, "The Minnesota Department of Public Safety is urging Minnesotans with homes built after 1989 to check for corrugated stainless steel tubing. If not properly installed, the flexible piping can be damaged by nearby lightning strikes and start a fire. As of 2010, about six million homes in the United States had CSST."

The Construction Defect Center is urging homeowners to contact them if their home contains corrugated stainless steel tubing, especially if they live in a subdivision in Ohio, Minnesota, Illinois, Massachusetts, New York, Maryland, New Jersey, Michigan, Virginia, North Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Louisiana, Texas, Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska, Colorado, Nevada, California, Oregon, Washington, or North Dakota. For more information about corrugated stainless steel tubing (CSST) homeowners are welcome to contact the Construction Defect Center at 866-714-6466.

WHAT DOES Corrugated stainless steel tubing (CSST) LOOK LIKE? The Minnesota Department of Public Safety say, "Corrugated stainless steel tubing (CSST) supplies natural gas and propane to homes and businesses. It usually has a yellow exterior plastic coating and should not be confused with natural gas appliance flexible connectors. CSST typically is routed beneath, through or alongside floor joists in the basement, inside interior wall cavities and on top of ceiling joists in attics. http://ConstructionDefectCenter.Com

Read more: Tubing creates fire risk in Minnesota homes built after 1989 - KMSP-TV http://www.myfoxtwincities.com/story/22782602/csst-fire-risk-minnesota-homes-built-after-1989#ixzz2Z2SEIsUe

View More About corrugated stainless steel tubing http://news.google.com/news/story?ncl=http://www.myfoxtwincities.com/story/22782602/csst-fire-risk-minnesota-homes-built-after-1989&hl=en&geo=us

Three lawsuits have been filed over CSST natural gas tubing, also called corrugated stainless steel tubing:

Hasley v. Ward Manufacturing, LLC No. 8:13-cv-01607(D. Md)

Hall v. Omega Flex, Inc., No. 0:13-cv-61213 (S.D. Fla.)

Hower v. Titeflex Corporation t/a/ Gastite, No. 2:13-cv-00753 (W.D. Pa)

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