Texas High School Wins Social Justice Award at New Tech Network Education Conference

Chad P. Wick Award for Social Justice Presented for Success in Closing Achievement Gap

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Lydia Dobyns, New Tech Network President

“On behalf of the entire New Tech Network community, it is my pleasure to recognize the outstanding teaching and learning demonstrated at METSA," said NTN President Dobyns.

Carrollton, TX (PRWEB) August 02, 2013

New Tech Network (NTN) announced at the recent New Tech Network Annual Conference (NTAC) in New Orleans, Louisiana, that Math, Engineering, Technology and Science Academy (METSA) was named recipient of the Chad P. Wick Award for Social Justice. This award is given to a school that demonstrates success in closing the achievement gap for underserved students.

“This award is a tremendous honor,” said Mansoureh Tehrani, Director of METSA. “What we do is believe that every child can succeed in mastering the content and skills they need to be college, career and life ready. We know that each child can succeed given a supportive environment that challenges them daily through inquiry.”

According to College and Work Readiness Assessment — utilized by NTN to test high school students on their skills of critical thinking, analytic reasoning, problem solving, and written communication — METSA showed 118 percent more growth in Deeper Learning than the comparison sample. Also, according to the National Student Clearinghouse (NSC), 86 percent of the METSA graduating class of 2011 has enrolled in postsecondary institutions to date. Another 9 percent of METSA students entered the military, police academy and local certificate programs not tracked by NSC.

“METSA has shown amazing strides in the effort to provide an education that is relevant for this century,” said Chad P. Wick, Founder and Director of KnowledgeWorks for whom the award was named.

“New Tech’s methods are empowering educators to reinvent their teaching style and students to better prepare themselves for careers in today’s world. That means leaving traditional teaching behind. Educators must be actively involved in curriculum development, making technology an integral part of learning and speaking to students in ways that cultivate a true love of learning.”

METSA’s achievement was applauded by more than 1,400 principals, teachers, staff, superintendents, alumni and students — representing more than 130 NTN schools nationwide attending this year’s conference. The event brought educators together to share strategies, learn new techniques and deepen the understanding of how best to support students in New Tech schools. It featured professional development to support principals, teachers and district leaders preparing students to be college and career ready.

METSA’s achievement was applauded by more than 1,400 principals, teachers, staff, superintendents, alumni and students — representing more than 130 NTN schools nationwide attending this year’s conference. The event brought educators together to share strategies, learn new techniques and deepen the understanding of how best to support students in New Tech schools. It featured professional development to support principals, teachers and district leaders preparing students to be college and career ready.

In addition to teacher training, conference events included a superintendent-focused forum, a student and alumni track, a track for those interested in starting a New Tech school, and academic leadership meetings.

“METSA’s accomplishments serve as strong support that all students are capable of learning, and that we can provide rigorous educational experiences that prepare students with the academic knowledge they need, as well as the skills necessary, to be college and career ready. METSA is an inspiration to us all,” said Lydia Dobyns, President of New Tech. “On behalf of the entire New Tech Network community, it is my pleasure to recognize the outstanding teaching and learning demonstrated at METSA.”

Other NTN schools have been recognized recently for their emphasis on providing STEM-focused learning. Earlier this year, President Obama visited a New Tech school in May for the launch of his “Middle Class Jobs and Opportunities tour.” The President visited Manor New Technology High School located outside of Austin, Texas, to highlight the school’s transformative approach to education and focus on the STEM subjects (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math).

New Tech Network, in partnership with public school districts and charter organizations, will support 30 new elementary, middle and high schools joining the Network in 2013, expanding to more than 130 schools in the U.S. and Australia. The most recent data from New Tech high schools show that New Tech students graduate at a rate 6 percent greater than the national average, enroll in college at a rate 9 percent greater than the national average, persist in 4-year colleges at a rate 17 percent greater than the national average and stay at 2-year colleges at a rate 46 percent greater than the national average. (Additional NTN outcomes for 2011-12 can be found here.)

First introduced in Napa, California, in 1996, the New Tech model has proven successful across diverse student populations in urban, rural and suburban public high schools. For a full list of New Tech schools, visit our website at: http://www.newtechnetwork.org/newtech_schools.

To see New Tech’s highly successful approach in action, please visit: http://www.newtechnetwork.org/inside_newtech.

About the New Tech Network
The New Tech design is a blueprint, accompanied by a set of core beliefs, tools, and strategies to help each school fulfill its purpose. New Tech design principles provide for an instructional approach centered on project-based learning, a culture that empowers students and teachers, and integrated use of technology in the classroom. Through extensive professional development, personalized coaching and access to Echo — a learning management system, NTN empowers principals, teachers, and students to develop compelling, relevant and meaningful learning communities.

NTN is a subsidiary of KnowledgeWorks, which seeks to transform U.S. public education from a world of schooling to a world of learning.

Media Contacts:
Krista Clark
707-307-3345
kclark(at)newtechnetowkr(dot)org

Twitter: @NewTechNetwork
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NewTechNetwork


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