Roy Orbison’s "Candy Man" Song Commemorated In Limited Edition Replica of Original Magazine Ad

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Orbison's estate issued a replica of the original '60s advertising art for the single "Candy Man" written by Beverly Ross and Fred Neil.

Candy Man poster available to commemorate the song recorded by Roy Orbison written by Beverly Ross and Fred Neil. http://beverlyross.info

Candy Man poster is a replica of original '60s magazine ad

He told me that in New Orleans all the prostitutes called their pimps their “Candy Man.”

Roy Orbison’s song "Candy Man" was more than just the B-side to his hit "Cryin'". The song, penned by Beverly Ross and Fred Neil was also an unexpected cross over hit into the country market for Orbison whose hits had previously charted mainly in the new "Rock and Roll" category.

To commemorate the success of the runaway hit, Orbison’s estate has issued a replica of the original ads placed in music industry publications at the time of the song’s release in 1961.

Songwriter Beverly Ross recently revealed the story behind the origin of the song "Candy Man" in her tell all memoire titled "I Was the First Woman Phil Spector Killed: An Autobiography in Essays of Brill Building Songwriter Beverly Ross, Premier Architect of Rock ‘N’ Roll."

"It was Fred’s idea," Beverly laughs. "He wanted to write a candy song with me since I’d had such success with my hit "Lollipop". He told me that in New Orleans all the prostitutes called their pimps their "Candy Man." I finally agreed to write the title with him, and it’s still a hit all these years later!"

Order the "Candy Man" poster at Roy Orbison dot com’s official store. Read more of the story behind the song "Candy Man" at http://beverlyross.info or order the book on Amazon.

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