Brand.com Offers Tips for Celebrities with Bad Reputations

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Brand.com lists several celebrities with adverse reputations, and offers them some advice.

Some people become famous on the basis of their positive achievements in film, in television, in music, or in athletics—but according to Brand.com, there are others who achieve notoriety on the basis of their personal meltdowns and public relations fiascos. These celebrities with bad reputations draw the attention of tabloid readers the world over, but, crucially, these infamous individuals are not forced to accept their bad public image. According to Brand.com, there are steps celebrities can take to rehabilitate their careers and to regain the respect of the public.

“A person can spend their entire career building a reputation, only to see the whole thing come crumbling down around them with just one ill-advised public comment, tweet, or TV appearance,” says Brand.com president Michael Zammuto, in the company’s new press statement. “Rebuilding one’s public perception is a process that takes time and discipline, but it is far from impossible, even for celebrities who have truly gone bust in the reputation department.”

Of these celebrities, Zammuto says that Amanda Bynes tops the list. “Brand.com has already named her the celebrity with the worst reputation of 2013,” he observes. “Between the drug and DUI accusations, her erratic public behavior, her Twitter meltdowns, and her bizarre court appearances, she has clearly come unraveled, and needs some strong reputation management.”

Indeed, Zammuto says that many of Bynes’ reputational woes come from poor branding. “She has lawyers and spokespeople out there making comments to the effect that she is ‘not crazy,’ which of course just makes the rest of us assume that she is crazy,” he comments. “A far more productive approach would be to focus her PR endeavors on reminding people of her actual accomplishments, and to shift the story completely away from the erratic behavior.”

Zammuto also points to another celebrity he believes could benefit from reputation management. “Jenny McCarthy was recently named as the new host of The View, and the announcement was met with much protest over Jenny McCarthy’s controversial views on child vaccinations,” he says. “Whether she is right or wrong on this subject, her reputation could be improved by a more focused PR effort emphasizing some of the more conventionally charitable and socially-responsible work she has done.”

Zammuto concludes with a few comments about Tom Cruise. “Tom Cruise is someone whose reputation has been in flux for years—not just because of his personal life, but because of the fact that he is far from the reliable box office draw he once was,” comments Zammuto. “At Brand.com, we believe Cruise could benefit from a reputation management campaign that puts the focus on his once-impressive track record as a major movie star, and makes it clear that he is ready to be that movie star again.”

The bottom line, according to the Brand.com president, is that “celebrities all have their brands—and it takes real work and foresight for them to maintain those brands in the face of rigorous public scrutiny.” Brand.com reviews the PR needs of celebrities from all fields and industries.

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Brand.com is the leading agency in the brand enhancement and online reputation management spheres, known for its ability to transform any personal or corporate brand into an authoritative one. The company’s client roster includes small businesses and Fortune 100 companies, as well as doctors, lawyers, teachers, colleges and universities, political campaigns, non-profit organizations, and everyday people. The firm is devoted to pioneering reputation defense strategies, PR management techniques, and the development of cutting-edge technologies. The objective of Brand.com is to establish each client’s personal or corporate brand as a brand of choice.

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Brittany Herron
Brand.com
800-269-7984
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