Alcohol Abuse: A Leading Health Issue Of Military Veterans

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According to a recent study, there is no conclusive proof that there is a link between the military veterans who served in combat overseas and those who suffer from alcohol abuse or depression. Anyone who is experiencing an alcohol dependency issue should contact a detox center like Harbor Village to begin the recovery process.

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“An alcohol abuse issue doesn't have to ruin your life. Contact a detox center such as Harbor Village and receive the care you need,” said Robert Niznik, Harbor Village CEO.

As reported by HealthDay (8/6), in the article titled, U.S. Troops’ Suicide Risk Tied to Mental Illness, Not Combat: Study, a new study has found that there is no direct connection between suicides among military personnel and if the problem is linked to combat duty served in Iraq and Afghanistan. Even though the rate of suicide has risen for military men and women, the study's researchers reported that the risk factors for them are the same as for civilians: depression and drinking issues.

At Harbor Village, an alcoholism treatment center, clients with substance abuse problems can check in and begin a proven step-by-step program to help them become sober. The facility addresses both alcohol and drugs in their beautiful South Florida setting. A 24/7 medically supervised detox center, Harbor Village allows each client to experience detoxification in a luxury, state-of-the art environment. Clients are welcomed with upscale accommodations including an attractively furnished suite complete with satellite television, 30,000 square feet of outdoor lounge area, spa, salon, massage and acupuncture services, nutritious, gourmet dining and the personalized support of a caring, attentive staff.

According to U.S. Troops’ Suicide Risk Tied to Mental Illness, Not Combat: Study, the Journal of the American Medical Association conducted a study of more than 150,000 active and retired U.S. military personnel. Between 2001-2008, 83 of those individuals died by suicide. Of those 83, 58% had not served in Iraq or Afghanistan.

“Deployment was not related to the risk of suicide,” said Dr. Nancy Crum-Cianflone of the Naval Health Research Center in San Diego. That does not prove that deployment has nothing to do with suicide risk — and for certain individuals it may. But these findings probably mean that deployment doesn’t play a large role.”

“A substance abuse issue doesn't have to ruin your life. Contact a detox center such as Harbor Village and receive the care you need,” said Robert Niznik, Harbor Village CEO.

For more information, visit: http://harborvillageflorida.com/ or call the 24/7 hotline at 1-855-338-6900.

Media Contact: 
Robert Niznik 
Harbor Village 
Miami, FL 
305-999-5728 
robert(at)harborvillageflorida(dot)com

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