RadioMD Encourages Parents to Keep up with Vaccinations to Keep Healthy Kids in School

“The danger of not having vaccinations up to date is that it puts your child at risk, as well as all the other children in a class or school. Fortunately, most of the traditional childhood diseases have been contained through vaccinations, but there continue to be children contracting diseases that have not been vaccinated."

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Deerfield, Illinois (PRWEB) August 19, 2013

Back to School means sending parents back to their child’s personal health files to ensure that they have had the proper vaccinations, as reported on “Healthy Children,” produced by http://www.RadioMD.com.

“The danger of not having vaccinations up to date is that it puts your child at risk, as well as all the other children in a class or school. Fortunately, most of the traditional childhood diseases have been contained through vaccinations, but there continue to be children contracting diseases that have not been vaccinated,” according to Dr. David Hill, Vice President of Cape Fear Pediatrics in Wilmington, NC, and Adjunct Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at UNC Medical School.

Dr. Hill advocates that all children should receive the school “booster” shot that protects against tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (whooping cough), which is showing a return in areas where many children remain unvaccinated.

“Kids aged 11-12 should be getting vaccinated against meningitis, particularly against the Meningococcal version, which is hard to treat and is highly contagious. Outbreaks have occurred in high school and colleges,” said Dr. Hill, who serves on the executive committees of the North Carolina Pediatric Society and the American Academy of Pediatrics Council on Communications and the Media.

Dr. Hill recommends that while most schools require vaccinations against measles, mumps and rubella, these childhood diseases can be lethal, and in the case of measles, very contagious.

He notes that while children are routinely vaccinated against Hepatitis A &B at birth, these viruses can still affect older children, especially those engaging in unprotected sex or sharing needles.

“Make sure you check with your school to determine which vaccinations your child must have. It protects your children and others,” said “Healthy Children” host Melanie Cole, MS, a mother of two who holds a Master of Science in Exercise Physiology/Kinesiology. Her program is supported by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP).

The interview is archived and can be heard by downloading: http://radiomd.com/show/healthy-children/item/13088-vaccinations-what-you-need-to-know-before-they-head-back-to-school


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