Dr. Daniel Rose, Medical Director for Healdsburg District Hospital’s Wound Care Program Anticipates Growth and Technology for the Innovative North Bay Program

Healdsburg District Hospital and its Wound Care Program headed by Dr. Daniel Rose brings the only Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy Chamber to Sonoma County and with an influx of patients, the program is expanding. Dr. Rose, a pioneer in skin graft technology is on the forefront of new medical research and hopes to unveil his skin graft technology, the fenestrator.

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(PRWEB) August 26, 2013

After two years of success and innovation with the only Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy Chamber (HBOT) in the North Bay, Dr. Daniel Rose of Healdsburg District Hospital’s (HDH) Wound Care Program foresees a larger and brighter future than HDH originally anticipated with HBOT technology. With the only HBOT in the North Bay and more than six million people in the United States suffering from chronic wounds, the program is experiencing an overflow of cases. While only 15 percent of patients treated at Northern California Wound Care will require this type of treatment, the program, currently has two chambers.

With patients visiting from all over Sonoma, Mendocino and Lake Counties to use the program’s Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT) and the innovative Wound Care Program, Dr. Rose hopes within the next year the program will add two additional chambers.

The HBOT at Healdsburg District Hospital is the only therapy of its kind in Sonoma County. The Northern California Wound Care Program run by medical director Dr. Daniel Rose has surpassed the national average and consistently heals 95-97% of wound cases. Since its inception in June 2010, the HBOT treats up to 8 patients a day for 2-hour sessions each. The HBOT has seen a significant influx of patients within the last five months and with such a high demand in patient care, Dr. Rose expects the Wound Care Program and HBOT to grow significantly in the coming years.

“I expect that not only will the program grow but technology will advance and with it the Wound Care program will follow,” states Dr. Rose.

The HBOT has helped patients across Northern California who suffer from various chronic wounds including foot ulcers, chronic bone infections and complications due to radiation therapy. Each day there are more inspirational stories from the use of the Wound Care Program and the HBOT. Dr. Rose treated an 18-year-old boy who suffered from a head-on car collision, where both leg bones were fractured and protruding through the skin. His wound wouldn’t heal properly and the steel rod that had been placed in his leg became infected. With the use of the advanced wound treatments at Healdsburg District Hospital, the granulation of tissue and negative pressure wound therapy covered the exposed bone and rod within months. With the help of skin grafts and wound care technology Dr. Rose and his team saw significant healing within 3-6 months, where other treatments had failed.

“The success of the HBOT has brought patients from across Northern California and we see that this optimal environment for healing has helped those that may have much worse fates without it,” states Dr. Rose.

Adding to the innovative technology at HDH, Dr. Rose is waiting on a patent for his skin graft design, the “fenestrator,” a plastic device that aims to replace the original heavy stainless steel device used in traditional skin grafting. The fenestrator is a new design developed by Dr. Rose that provides an easier technique for perforating skin grafts and will reduce the cost of using the now, widely used skin substitutes. This device would replace the long-used “mesher” which costs $10,000 and is time consuming to sterilize. Rose’s device would be a single-use, sterile, recyclable and a cost effective alternative at only $25. Additionally, Dr. Rose, throughout his career, has conducted research that helped with the development of the nicotine patch and long-acting sunscreen. His new research, after two years of anticipation could contribute to the advancement of skin graft technology, while reducing overall costs.

“It has been a long journey. I have worked really hard on this for so long, I just can’t wait till it is accepted by the medical community and we start to see dramatic changes from it, “ states Dr. Rose.

Dr. Rose and the Wound Care Program at HDH show no signs of slowing down. Dr. Rose plans to go back to teaching and lecturing as well as continuing outreach for the use of hyperbaric chambers in hospitals throughout the country. Dr. Rose will also continue to direct and expand HDH’s innovative Wound Care Program.

HDH is a non-profit hospital that serves as the first-line, outpatient and emergency facility for the 60,000 residents of the North Bay for over a century. HDH offers services in orthopedics and rehabilitation, neurology, pulmonary medicine, occupational health, pediatrics, geriatrics, emergency/urgent care, cardiology along with many others. HDH offers high-quality healthcare with the latest in medical technology and innovation. You can contact Dr. Rose and the Wound Care Program at (707) 473-4404 or visit their website.


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