Water Industry Stock Investment Undervalued Reports Water Analyst Sharon Kleyne

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Global Fresh Water Supply in Crisis and Seeks Investment Says Water Analyst Sharon Kleyne.

Water industry stocks are among the world’s best investment opportunities and will be for the foreseeable future, reports water analyst and researcher Sharon Kleyne. The global fresh water supply is in crisis, Kleyne explains. To keep up with demand, and to offset population growth and a depleted supply, the fresh water industry requires substantial investor support. Because many investors are uneducated about the extent and urgency of the crisis, water industry stocks tend to be undervalued.

Sharon Kleyne, Founder of Bio Logic Aqua Research, has spent 30 years researching the relationship between skin and eye dehydration and the diminishing quality of the air’s water vapor/humidity. The hand-held personal humidifying devices she developed are the industry standard for natural fresh water moisture supplementation. Kleyne’s global patents, technological breakthroughs and humanitarian outreach have elevated her Research Center to iconic status.

Kleyne also hosts the globally syndicated Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water® radio show on VoiceAmerica and Apple iTunes.

Many investors, says Kleyne, like the general public, are not well educated about the global water industry opportunity because the crisis has not yet impacted them. On the other hand, most knowledgeable stock analysts are extremely aware of the rapid growth in water stocks. One high profile water investor is Nestle Chairman Peter Brabeck. Says Brabeck, “Water is the most important resource for mankind. And despite this, water is not recognized as such or nor valued enough.” Nestle is the global leader in investment in bottled drinking water.

A summary of the February, 2013, water conference sponsored by Goldman Sachs noted that, “Investing in water infrastructure can offer long-term regulated rates that are inflation protected and less susceptible to economic cycles.” According to Waterbank.com, water industry investment opportunities would be greatly enhanced by a water futures or commodity exchange. Author Steven Solomon, in the best selling book, Water: the Epic Struggle (Harper-Collins, 2010), concludes that, “In the 21st Century, water is the new oil.”

According to Kleyne, the global fresh water crisis, and the need for water industry investment, will not end any time soon. Worldwide, according to water.com, one billion people lack access to safe water and 200 million hours a day are spent collecting water. Even in the United States, many long established water sources, such as the Colorado River, are now threatened.

No known life form on Earth, says Kleyne, can survive without fresh water on and in the ground. Often overlooked, Kleyne believes, is the vapor/humidity in the air, which may be even more critical to life. Although water covers 70% of the planet’s surface, fresh water is far less abundant and unevenly distributed. According to the United Nations, equitable access to fresh water is too often hampered by poor management, government corruption and, according to Kleyne, lack of education and awareness.

Kleyne believes that because of its universal importance, fresh safe water must be kept affordable. She notes that many municipal water companies do not charge customers the full value of their water. Fresh, clean water and water vapor, according to Kleyne, are essential to economic development. Abundant fresh water is required for disease prevention, sanitation, drinking, agriculture, technology, most industrial processes, power, recreation and much more.

According to water investment expert Neil Grigg, PhD, speaking on the Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water, water is a $200 billion industry in the United States and an important job creator employing about one million people. Worldwide, water is a trillion dollar industry, employing 5 to 10 million people. Grigg is author of Water Finance (Wiley, 2011).

The water industry includes agricultural irrigation, water capture and storage, bottled beverage water, industrial water, water wells, municipal water and waste water treatment. Water suppliers may be local, federal, cooperative or private. When well managed, with adequate investor support, says Kleyne, most government or cooperative water companies can realize an excellent return while keeping the price affordable.

Humanity, Kleyne concludes, is at a crossroads. We have the choice of working together and investing for the good of everyone and the health of the planet. Or we can continue to be short-sighted and allow Earth’s rare and wonderful water treasure, in the words of DeWayne Cecil, PhD, NASA Climatologist and frequent Sharon Kleyne Hour guest, to go the way of Mars, whose once abundant water supply long ago dried up and drifted into space.

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Mikaylah Roggasch
Bio Logic Aqua Research-Rogue Media
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