Southwest Skin and Cancer Institute Employs Botox for New Indications

Botox has been at the forefront of skin rejuvenation for over a decade. Besides the conventional uses of Botox, Southwest Skin and Cancer Institute is utilizing this versatile drug to aid in the treatment of several medical conditions.

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Botox is Useful for More Than Wrinkles

Prescott, AZ (PRWEB) September 24, 2013

Since 2002, Botox has been used to reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles around the brow, forehead, chin, crow’s feet and neck. These creases often create a tired or stressed appearance which can be softened by the use of Botox. With relaxation of the facial muscles, the skin generates new collagen which fills in the creases. But besides the face, Botox has been used to reduce excessive perspiration, which can be embarrassing and result in staining of clothes. Botox has been effective at relaxing tense jaw muscles which cause TMJ or teeth-grinding. Finally, Botox is recognized to reduce the frequency of migraines. Recently, even more uses for Botox have been discovered, revealing how versatile the drug is.

Research by the American Academy of Dermatology, continues to lead to an understanding of how Botox interacts with the blood vessels and nerves. This research is being spurred by the huge potential for future breakthroughs in the treatment of certain inflammatory skin diseases, like psoriasis and eczema, which are typically treated with topical steroids. Steroids can reduce inflammation of skin, however they are a double-edged sword since prolonged use can lead to irreversible thinning of the skin and other side effects. Because of this, dermatologists are constantly seeking alternatives to topical steroid drugs. Botox appears to moderate inflammation in both psoriasis and eczema.

Another use of Botox that has shown effectiveness is for the treatment chronic itching of unknown cause. The sensation of itch is carried by nerve fibers. Since the mechanism of Botox is to interrupt nerve signals from reaching the brain, it is no surprise that Botox can prevent itching in some cases.

According to the Plastic Surgery Institute of Southern Illinois University in 2012, Botox has been shown to combat rheumatic conditions such as Raynaud’s phenomenon, a disorder in which cold temperatures cause painful swelling of the fingertips. When Botox is injected, relief of pain is almost immediate in about 84% of participants. Up to now reliable treatment for Raynaud’s syndrome has not been available.

“I am pleased to have found a novel approach to the treatment of psoriasis, chronic itching and Raynaud’s phenomena that is safe and effective,” comments Robin Fleck, M.D., medical director of Southwest Skin and Cancer Institute in Prescott, Arizona. Dr. Fleck has recently begun to evaluate the drug for these medical conditions in her dermatology practice.

Cosmetic dermatologist, Robin Fleck, M.D., is a double board certified dermatologist and internist, recognized by the American Board of Dermatology and the American Board of Internal Medicine. She is founder and Medical Director of Southwest Skin and Cancer Institute and Body Oasis Laser Aesthetics http://www.rejuvadoc.com. Dr. Fleck is a fellow of the American Society of Laser Medicine and Surgery and the American Academy of Dermatology. Dr. Fleck is also the director of Vein Specialties in Prescott, Arizona and is a member of the American Venous Forum.


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