Yourwellness Magazine Gets Behind World Breastfeeding Week

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Yourwellness Magazine Weighs in On Health Benefits of Breastfeeding with WHO releasing a report.

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According to a new WHO report, published during World Breastfeeding Week (August 1st to August 7th), only 37 countries, or 19% of those reporting, have passed laws that reflect every recommendation from the International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes. Dr Carmen Casanovas, breastfeeding expert with WHO’s Department of Nutrition for Health and Development, noted, “Nearly all mothers are physically able to breastfeed and will do so if they have accurate information and support. But in many cases, women are discouraged from doing so, and are misled to believe that they are giving their children a better start in life by buying commercial substitutes.” (http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/releases/2013/world_breastfeeding_week_20130730/en/index.html)

Therefore, Yourwellness Magazine looked into the health benefits of breast feeding, commenting on a study which found a link between breast feeding and a reduction in child asthma. “The effects of respiratory infections, atopy, and breastfeeding on childhood asthma”, published in the May 2002 edition of European Respiratory Journal, showed that exclusive breastfeeding (or, feeding a baby nothing but human breast milk) for the first six months of life can lower asthma and respiratory symptoms during the first four years of a child’s life. (http://erj.ersjournals.com/content/19/5/899.full?sid=7fd2efeb-5ca5-49ac-8b6c-4550cfaf7a76)

Yourwellness Magazine explained that while it has already been established that breast feeding is beneficial to child health during their infancy and early life, this study is the first to show that these benefits can be extended up to four years of age, depending on the period of time that the mother breastfeeds for. The results of the study showed that symptoms such as phlegm and episodes of wheezing were far greater in babies that were not breastfed or fed for a relatively short time when compared to those who had been fully breastfed for a longer period of time. Yourwellness Magazine commented that this news may encourage mothers to not only breastfeed their babies, but continue to breastfeed them up until six months of age. (http://www.yourwellness.com/2013/03/could-you-stop-your-child-developing-asthma/#sthash.umozJh7R.dpuf)

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Michael Kitt
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