Gardasil: Study Shows African American Women Refuse Vaccination; The CBCD Proposes a Clinically Proven HPV Remedy

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According to a study published on January 24, 2013 in the Journal of Adolescent Health, “African-Americans remained less likely than whites to have initiated (HPV) vaccination (1).” The Center for the Biology of Chronic Disease (CBCD) highlights polyDNA’s Gene-Eden-VIR.

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The CBCD would like to take this opportunity to propose to these women, and others who have similar concerns, a dietary supplement called Gene-Eden-VIR.

The CBCD has learned that many African American women have a negative attitude toward Gardasil and Cervarix, the two HPV vaccines, according to a new study (1). The CBCD would like to suggest some possible explanations for this negative attitude.

One possible explanation is that these women are more informed than some medical researchers realize. Perhaps these women are familiar with the ideas captured in the statements from Cancer.gov, which say that the HPV vaccines do not treat HPV in individuals already infected with the virus (2). Maybe they are familiar with other ideas on WebMD, which says “These HPV vaccines are not foolproof. They do not protect against all of the 100-plus types of HPV (3).” This quote was found on a page last reviewed by Dr. Kimball Johnson, MD on August 13, 2012.

The CBCD also suggests that these women may be familiar with the disclaimers on the Gardasil website, which notes that “GARDASIL may not fully protect everyone, nor will it protect against diseases caused by other HPV types… GARDASIL does not prevent all types of cervical cancer… GARDASIL does not treat cervical cancer or genital warts (4).”

Therefore, the CBCD would like to take this opportunity to propose to these women, and others who have similar concerns, a dietary supplement called Gene-Eden-VIR. This product has been proven to reduce symptoms during an HPV infection. In fact, a new clinical study has provided evidence for the safety and effectiveness of this natural product (5). The study was published in the peer reviewed, medical journal Pharmacology & Pharmacy, in a special edition on Advances in Antiviral Drugs.

In that study, Gene-Eden-VIR was shown to reduce HPV symptoms in individuals already infected with HPV. Study authors wrote that, “individuals infected with the HPV, … reported a safe decrease in their symptoms following treatment with Gene-Eden-VIR (5).” The study authors also wrote that “We observed a statistically significant decrease in the severity, duration, and frequency of symptoms (5).”

Women with HPV symptoms should ask their doctor about Gene-Eden-VIR. Their doctors can explain to them how it was proven to reduce HPV symptoms safely and effectively, and how the clinical study followed FDA guidelines. The CBCD suggests that people print a copy of the study and bring it to their doctors.

To view the entire study or to print it, visit: http://www.scirp.org/journal/PaperInformation.aspx?PaperID=36101

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References:

(1)    http://www.jahonline.org/article/S1054-139X(13)00367-4/abstract
(2)    http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/prevention/HPV-vaccine
(3)    http://www.webmd.com/sexual-conditions/hpv-genital-warts/hpv-vaccines-human-papillomavirus
(4)    http://www.gardasil.com/about-gardasil/about-gardasil/
(5)    http://www.scirp.org/journal/PaperInformation.aspx?PaperID=36101

polyDNA is a biotechnology company that develops dietary supplements using the unique scientific method developed by Dr. Hanan Polansky, which is based on Computer Intuition.

In addition to his unique scientific method, Dr. Polansky published the highly acclaimed scientific discovery, called Microcompetition with Foreign DNA. The discovery explains how foreign DNA fragments, and specifically, DNA of latent viruses, cause most major diseases.

polyDNA developed Gene-Eden-VIR, an antiviral natural remedy that helps the immune system kill latent viruses.

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Hanan Polansky
Center for the Biology of Chronic Disease (CBCD)
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