The National Ovarian Cancer Coalition Supports & Encourages Participation in Nationwide Ovarian Cancer Healthy Lifestyle Study through UA Cancer Center

The National Ovarian Cancer Coalition (NOCC) is partnering with the GOG (Gynecologic Oncology Group), National Cancer Institute (NCI) and others in funding the GOG 0225, LIvES clinical trial studying how diet and physical activity together can improve the quality of life and prevent recurrence among women diagnosed with ovarian cancer. Few trials to date have been conducted in the areas of diet and physical activity, though growing evidence suggests both may play an integral role in ovarian cancer, which has a high recurrence rate.

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Find out more at www.ovarianlives.org

www.ovarianlives.org

I have everything to gain from this study and hopefully it will benefit people down the line. I am so excited to be doing some good.

Dallas, TX (PRWEB) September 05, 2013

The National Ovarian Cancer Coalition (NOCC) is partnering with the GOG (Gynecologic Oncology Group), National Cancer Institute (NCI) and others in funding the GOG 0225, LIvES Study*. This is the first large, nationwide trial seeking to determine how diet and physical activity together can improve the quality of life and prevent recurrence among women diagnosed with ovarian cancer. The trial is being overseen by the University of Arizona Cancer Center (UACC).

The NOCC is committed to furthering research efforts that focus on better detecting ovarian cancer and on improving quality of life for those affected by ovarian cancer. Overall, the ten-year survival rate for ovarian cancer is only 34% (ACS Cancer Facts & Figures, 2013). The main objective of this landmark study is to determine if the lifestyle intervention group experiences improved quality of life and survival in comparison to the usual care group.

Only around three percent of cancer patients participate in clinical trials nationally. "To make scientific progress will take a critical mass of patients and practices willing to participate in ovarian cancer clinical trials, along with the funding to support this research," says David Barley, Chief Executive Officer for the National Ovarian Cancer Coalition.

Few trials have been conducted in the areas of diet and physical activity, though growing evidence suggests both may play an integral role in ovarian cancer, which has a high recurrence rate. A participant at Maine Medical Center shares, "I have everything to gain from this study and hopefully it will benefit people down the line. I am so excited to be doing some good."

The LIvES (Lifestyle Intervention for Ovarian Cancer Enhanced Survival) study is recruiting 1,070 stage II-IV ovarian, primary peritoneal and fallopian tube cancer survivors from GOG clinics across the country. As of August 2013, 220 clinic sites and 155 participants are enrolled.

  •     The study will use an innovative combination of telephone and web-based coaching software designed specifically for GOG 0225.
  •     Each woman will be randomly assigned to either the intervention or usual care group. Both groups will receive telephone-based coaching from UACC.
  •     The study participants will be contacted by UACC a minimum of 22 times over the two-year period.
  •     Women will be asked to fill out questionnaires regarding their diet, physical activity, other lifestyle and health issues, and overall quality of life. Blood samples will also be collected.
"This trial fills a huge gap concerning what women can do to stay healthy and free of ovarian cancer after chemotherapy successfully has been completed," says David S. Alberts, MD, UACC director and co-chair of the LIvES study. At the UACC, Dr. Alberts helps to coordinate Phase I and II and pharmacokinetic drug studies for molecularly-targeted chemopreventive agents and anticancer drugs. His research, for more than 35 years, has involved innovative treatments for advanced ovarian cancers.

This year alone approximately 22,240 women in the U.S. will be diagnosed with ovarian cancer (ACS Cancer Statistics, 2013) and there are estimated to be over 180,000 women alive in the U.S. who have been diagnosed with ovarian cancer (NCI SEER Program, 2009). The NOCC is committed to this research endeavor and working with the researchers to further explore the role that lifestyle may have regarding ovarian cancer. Read more about participating in this trial at http://www.ovarianlives.org. Also visit NOCC’s clinical trials page at http://www.ovarian.org/clinical_trials.php.

*The LIvES Study is supported in part by grant number CA101165 from the National Cancer Center of the National Institutes of Health.

About the National Ovarian Cancer Coalition

Since its inception in 1995, the National Ovarian Cancer Coalition (NOCC) has been committed to raising awareness of ovarian cancer and providing support, education, and hope for women affected by ovarian cancer, and their families. Establishing itself as an important national advocate for ovarian cancer patients, the NOCC remains steadfast in its mission to raise awareness and promote education about ovarian cancer. The Coalition aims to improve the survival rate and quality of life for ovarian cancer patients and provide resources to family and friends of ovarian cancer survivors.

http://www.ovarian.org | 888-OVARIAN


Contact

  • Christina Lizaso
    National Ovarian Cancer Coalition, Inc.
    (214) 273-4211
    Email
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