Scambook Alerts of "Reshipping" Job Scam on Sites Like Craigslist, LinkedIn, and CareerBuilder

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A new Internet employment scam is targeting job seekers with fraudulent "reshipping" schemes on sites like Craigslist, LinkedIn and CareerBuilder. Scambook, the Internet’s leading complaint resolution platform, is warning job seekers that scammers are looking for them to redistribute stolen or counterfeit goods, or simply ripping off job seekers with fraudulent paychecks.

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As job seekers become more desperate for full or even part-time, work-at-home employment, they may lose perspective and fall for a job scam that seems too good to be true.

A new Internet employment scam is targeting job seekers with fraudulent "reshipping" schemes on sites like Craigslist, LinkedIn and CareerBuilder. Scambook, the Internet’s leading complaint resolution platform, is warning job seekers that scammers are looking for them to redistribute stolen or counterfeit goods, or simply ripping off job seekers with fraudulent paychecks.

“Scammers are taking advantage of today's difficult job market by preying on individuals who are struggling to find new jobs or supplement their current income," says Scambook’s Director of Marketing Kase Chong. "As job seekers become more desperate for full or even part-time, work-at-home employment, they may lose perspective and fall for a job scam that seems too good to be true."

A recent college grad in Fresno, CA named Buddy Senatore told ABC News about a scam where a packaging company guaranteed him a full salary of $2K a month or $30 per completed package, with benefits and vacation time for just going to the post office. *

The United States Postal Inspection Service says, “Criminals post job announcements on Internet career sites offering work-at-home positions—sometimes advertised as “merchandising manager” or “package processing assistant.” Duties include receiving packages and mailing them to a foreign address on behalf of a client, using postage-paid mailing labels provided via email.” **

In this scam, the packages often contain stolen goods, counterfeit goods, goods purchased with stolen credit cards or counterfeit money orders. In addition, employees are often paid with the same counterfeit checks or money orders causing workers to be liable with the bank and facing possible charges after depositing such false “paychecks.”

Scambooks warns individuals looking for “package processing assistant” jobs about the following red flags that can indicate the job is part of this scam:

1.    Packages arrived addressed to someone else’s name at your address.

2.    Packages arrive at the door marked “Return to sender,” however, the receiver never sent them originally.

3.    “Employers” pay employees by money order, which employees must deduct their earnings from prior to wiring the rest to them.

Should any of this sound familiar, individuals should report the company to authorities immediately. Researching companies prior to employment is always a key step in applying for any position. Speaking with someone over the phone, asking questions, and verifying the employer are great methods to cover all bases and ensure a job is not fraudulent or illegal.

ABOUT SCAMBOOK
Scambook is an online complaint resolution platform dedicated to obtaining justice for victims of fraud with unprecedented speed and accuracy. By building communities and providing resources on the latest scams, Scambook arms consumers with the up-to-date information they need to stay on top of emerging schemes. Since its inception, Scambook has resolved over $10 million in reported consumer damages. For more information, visit scambook.com.

** United States Postal Inspective Service; https://postalinspectors.uspis.gov/radDocs/consumer/ReshippingScam.html 08/22/2013

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Judy Dixon
PMBC Group
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