Yourwellness Magazine Explores the Health Benefits of Chocolate

Share Article

As the NHS and British Dietetic Association have noted that the unhealthy ingredients in chocolate affect the health benefits of cocoa, Yourwellness Magazine outlined healthier ways to consume chocolate.

Yourwellness Logo for What is ASMA

Yourwellness, the gateway to living well

On the 12th of June 2013, the NHS teamed up with the British Dietetic Association (BDA) to examine whether the health claims made about chocolate are supported by the evidence. The article “Are chocolate's health claims for real?” explored whether or not evidence shows that chocolate benefits people blood pressure, cancer and stress. Alison Hornby, a dietician and BDA spokesperson, commented, “the potential health benefit of some compounds in the chocolate have to be weighed against the fact that to make chocolate, cocoa is combined with sugar and fat. This means chocolate is an energy-dense food that could contribute to weight gain and a higher risk of disease." (http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/superfoods/Pages/is-chocolate-a-superfood.aspx)

Yourwellness Magazine was therefore inspired to take a closer look at chocolate, and outline healthier chocolate-eating practises. Yourwellness Magazine explained, “Chocolate dates back to the time of the Aztecs when cocoa beans were so highly prized they were used as currency during the reign of Montezuma. The Aztecs consumed chocolate in the form of a sweetened drink, which was believed to increase wisdom, boost energy levels and have a powerful aphrodisiac action. Modern forms of chocolate combine cocoa paste with cocoa butter, sugar and cream plus a variety of additional flavourings such as vanilla, nuts and liqueurs. While these may improve flavour, they can reduce its health value.” (http://www.yourwellness.com/2012/02/the-wellness-benefits-of-chocolate/#sthash.zB7lsJ2X.dpuf)

Yourwellness Magazine outlined healthier ways to consume chocolate:

1. Select chocolate that is dark and expensive.

2. Eat chocolate after a meal, as the feeling of fullness will decrease the risk of over-indulgence.

3. Buy small sized bars rather than family-sized slabs.

4. Let chocolate rest in the mouth long enough to melt and coat the taste-buds. This helps individuals to experience the full range of flavours and textures, which, in turn, reduces the need for more chocolate.

5. Learn to savour the lingering memory of each bite before immediately devouring the next.

To find out more, visit the gateway to living well at http://yourwellness.com.

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Michael Kitt
Visit website