Scambook Offers Tips to Avoid Phishing Scams and Email Spam

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As phishing scams and spam messages continue to capitalize on the “spoofing” technique to fake their sender information, Scambook has noticed the increased need to warn consumers about how to avoid such schemes. Spoofed emails can lead to computer viruses or even more serious threats such as identity theft.

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Consumers need to be aware of these scams and pay closer attention to sender information when they receive an email. By detecting a spoofed sender address, consumers can avoid phishing scams and other types of email fraud that's currently on the rise.

As phishing scams and spam messages continue to capitalize on the “spoofing” technique to fake their sender information, Scambook has noticed the increased need to warn consumers about how to avoid such schemes. Spoofed emails can lead to computer viruses or even more serious threats such as identity theft.

“Consumers need to be aware of these scams and pay closer attention to sender information when they receive an email. By detecting a spoofed sender address, consumers can avoid phishing scams and other types of email fraud that's currently on the rise,” says Scambook’s Director of Marketing Kase Chong.

Scambook recommends the following four tips to determine if an email was sent fraudulently:

1.    Email Headers: Consumers need to pay close attention to email headers as “header” code can tell a lot about where an email really came from. As messages are delivered, they are passed from server to server, where each server adds records to the invisible message header. Therefore, by determining how to find the header and what it means, email scams can be spotted immediately. For Gmail users, going to the drop down menu next to the “Reply” icon, users can find this information by clicking “Show Original.”

2.    MX Lookup: “MX” which stands for “Mail Exchanger,” is the server a domain uses to route an email. Tools such as MxToolbox help find the MX server for the last trusted domain in the header. By identifying your own domain’s stamp, users can identify what IP address sent the message to that domain. If a spammer or scammer has been reported sending dubious mail before, there’s a good chance the address will appear on a Blacklist.

3.    IP Blacklists: IP addresses on the blacklist can also be checked by following the “Show Original” step and pasting all the header information into a tool like Google Header Analysis, which shows all the IPs involved. For those who have MxToolbox, this tool too can run a blacklist check on IP addresses.

4.    Don’t Feed The Spammers: Some individuals think by replying to a bogus email with an identity-affirming trick question is a good way to detect a spoofed fraud message. However, if the email is from a scammer, this will simply advertise that the email address is active, causing an influx of more spam. It’s best not to reply if unsure about an email.

ABOUT SCAMBOOK
Scambook is an online complaint resolution platform dedicated to obtaining justice for victims of fraud with unprecedented speed and accuracy. By building communities and providing resources on the latest scams, Scambook arms consumers with the up-to-date information they need to stay on top of emerging schemes. Since its inception, Scambook has resolved over $10 million in reported consumer damages. For more information, visit scambook.com.

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Judy Dixon
PMBC Group
+1 (310) 777-7546
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