CLIR Receives IMLS Grant to Identify Needs in Continuing Education for Managing Cultural Heritage Data

Study will examine federally mandated plans for open access and their implications for continuing education needs for libraries, museums, and other cultural heritage institutions.

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"New government requirements for exposing and managing federally funded research data add urgency to the challenge of curating data. That urgency is even more pronounced in the cultural heritage arena."

Washington, DC (PRWEB) September 26, 2013

The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) has awarded the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) a Laura Bush 21st Century Librarian Program grant of $164,243 to examine the federally mandated plans for open access and their implications for continuing education needs for libraries, museums, and other cultural heritage institutions.

In February 2013, the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) issued a memorandum directing the heads of executive departments and agencies to develop plans promoting open access to data and publications. While agencies have been instructed to coordinate their responses and associated plans to minimize burden and costs, there will inevitably be discrepancies across plans, communities of interest or practice, and agencies, as the needs, resources, and capacities vary.

“New government requirements for exposing and managing federally funded research data add urgency to the challenge of curating data," said CLIR President Charles J. Henry. "That urgency is even more pronounced in the cultural heritage arena where distinctive needs must be identified and addressed. This timely grant ensures ample exploration of those needs with resulting guidelines that will help define the future of continuing education needs.”

Under this one-year grant, CLIR will conduct research in three areas. Part 1 involves a highly structured content analysis of select federal agency plans for supporting open access to data and publications, identifying the commonalities and differences among the plans with emphasis on access to data. Part 2 takes the results of the content analysis and traces its implications for IMLS program areas and the cultural heritage institutions they serve. Part 3 identifies the gaps in current continuing education opportunities and approaches for cultural heritage professionals, assessing the readiness of the current professional workforce and identifying how best to address the needs and close the gaps in the immediate and longer term.

The Laura Bush 21st Century Librarian Program supports projects to recruit and educate the next generation of librarians, faculty, and library leaders; and to support early career research. It also assists in the professional development of librarians and library staff.

The Institute of Museum and Library Services is the primary source of federal support for the nation's 123,000 libraries and 17,500 museums. Its mission is to inspire libraries and museums to advance innovation, lifelong learning, and cultural and civic engagement. IMLS grant making, policy development, and research help libraries and museums deliver valuable services that make it possible for communities and individuals to thrive. To learn more, visit http://www.imls.gov and follow IMLS on Facebook and Twitter.

About the Council on Library and Information Resources
The Council on Library and Information Resources is an independent, nonprofit organization that forges strategies to enhance research, teaching, and learning environments in collaboration with libraries, cultural institutions, and communities of higher learning. CLIR aspires to transform the information landscape to support the advancement of knowledge. CLIR promotes forward-looking collaborative solutions that transcend disciplinary, institutional, professional, and geographic boundaries in support of the public good. To learn more, visit http://www.clir.org.