Scambook Recommends Six Tips to Keep IP Camera Hackers from Gaining Access to Your Home Videos

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Internet Protocol cameras (IP cameras) have been enabling consumers to gain live Internet video streams of their home, office, pets, and even children. Although these video feeds are meant to be private, Scambook is issuing a warning that hackers may be able to gain access to these cameras to spy on consumers and their families.

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It's important to research an IP camera's privacy protection before broadcasting any sort of content over the web. Live Internet video streams can give hackers access to important knowledge such as when homes are unoccupied, which could lead to break-ins.

Internet Protocol cameras (IP cameras) have been enabling consumers to gain live Internet video streams of their home, office, pets, and even children. Although these video feeds are meant to be private, Scambook is issuing a warning that hackers may be able to gain access to these cameras to spy on consumers and their families.

“It's important to research an IP camera's privacy protection before broadcasting any sort of content over the web. Live Internet video streams can give hackers access to important knowledge such as when homes are unoccupied, which could lead to break-ins or other damage,” says Scambook’s Director of Marketing Kase Chong.

Scambook recommends the following four tips to make sure IP cameras are secure from hackers:

1.    Before Buying, Read the Box: It’s important to purchase a camera that encrypts its video data so that only authorized users can view the video feed.

2.    Use a Secure Internet Connection: Secure Internet connections needs to be used when transmitting video feeds. A camera should support current wireless security protocols as well, such as WPA 2 (Wi-Fi Protected Access 2)

3.    Secure Websites to View the Feed: Just as with other URLs, it’s important to make sure the website broadcasting the video feed starts with “https,” instead of “http,” when you log in.

4.    Pick a Secure, Unique Password: Even if cameras allow you to turn the password requirement off, never choose this option. This would enable a live public broadcast of anything cameras see. Passwords should be 10 or more characters, capital and lower-case letters, numbers and symbols, and not be the same as that used for another website or service.

5.    Don’t Get Careless with the Mobile App: Mobile apps may not have the same security standards as IP camera websites. Although convenience is key with these apps, users must stay protected logging in through secure password protected networks. A great alternative is to use a phone’s built-in browser to access the same page as if on a computer.

6.    Keep Your Software Up-To-Date: Updates include new protocols to protect against those newly-discovered viruses and privacy threats. This should be done both for camera software as well as any software associated with the mobile app.

ABOUT SCAMBOOK
Scambook is an online complaint resolution platform dedicated to obtaining justice for victims of fraud with unprecedented speed and accuracy. By building communities and providing resources on the latest scams, Scambook arms consumers with the up-to-date information they need to stay on top of emerging schemes. Since its inception, Scambook has resolved over $10 million in reported consumer damages. For more information, visit scambook.com.

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Judy Dixon
PMBC Group
+1 (310) 777-7546
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