HPV Vaccine: A Strong Criticism from Leading Israeli OBGYN Doctor

A new article published in the Israeli newspaper, The Jerusalem Post on September 22, 2013 said that Professor Uzi Beller, an obstetrics/gynecology chief and an international authority on gynecological cancers, strongly criticized Gardasil vaccination (1). The Center for the Biology of Chronic Disease (CBCD) urges American pediatricians and OBGYNs to consider the evidence.

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There is no evidence that prophylactic (preventative) vaccination against HPV types 16 and 18 reduces the incidence of cervical cancer. - Dr. Uzi Beller, Shaare Zedek Medical Center

Rochester, NY (PRWEB) September 22, 2013

The CBCD has learned that Dr. Uzi Beller, “an international authority on gynecological cancers who treats patients on a daily basis (1)”, came out publicly against vaccinating 65,000, 14-year old girls in Israel with Gardasil (1). Dr. Beller voiced his criticism of Gardasil vaccination at “a meeting in Tel Aviv 10 days ago (with) 40 leading experts on gynecology, oncology, women’s health, vaccines and other specialties (1).”

When describing his opposition to Gardasil vaccination, Dr. Beller said, “I am not at all against vaccines. I just underwent the oral polio vaccination as the Health Ministry instructed medical institutions to give the two drops to every doctor who is in direct contact with patients. But, HPV is different from all other vaccines. It is not a vaccination against cervical cancer but against a virus that in some cases causes a premalignant condition, and in a small number of cases, a malignancy (1).”

“…in an interview with The Jerusalem Post in his office, (Dr. Beller) noted that the …pharmaceutical companies that manufacture the vaccine have been extremely aggressive in their lobbying and marketing; the vaccines are worth billons of dollars to them. At the same time, he said, many medical professionals who advocate vaccination have been pushing a “populistic campaign without being familiar with the issue (1).”

Dr. Beller continued by saying, “I would be happy to see a solution to this disease. Unlike mammography, there is no organized health fund screening for cervical cancer required, even though Pap smear testing has been shown to be worthwhile in early detection. I want to see fundamental studies proving efficacy, and they do not exist. The vaccines were tested on mostly white women attending colleges and university – mostly from developed countries and healthy. The data were based on a relatively short-term follow-up period. What is known does not yet justify widespread vaccination of healthy girls (1).”

Moreover, the Jerusalem Post report said that “Beller stressed that girls taking the vaccine should continue with Pap screening. ‘All the experts accept this, and This is accepted by everybody and actually means that the vaccine gives only limited protection, if any. Major studies have shown that women who were vaccinated nevertheless developed cervical cancer.’ (1)”

“ ‘If the HPV vaccine, however, were proven to prevent cervical cancer, that would be something else,’ Beller continued. ‘But it hasn’t. The US Food and Drug Administration checks for safety of the vaccine, but (does not check) for efficacy. There is no evidence that the vaccine protects against cervical cancer, only (that it) counters the virus itself. No decrease in invasive cervical cancer... in the vaccinated population has been documented so far. Australia was the first country to implement a school based mass vaccination program with Gardasil in April 2007.’ The World Health Organization in 2009 recommended the use of HPV vaccines for primary prevention of cervical cancer. But there is no evidence that prophylactic (preventative) vaccination against HPV types 16 and 18 reduces the incidence of cervical cancer (1).”

Health Ministry officials (in Israel) continue to consider canceling plans to administer the HPV vaccine, following studies suggesting vaccine-linked autoimmune conditions and other adverse effects (1).

“We wonder why the CDC and FDA are pushing Gardasil so strongly when health ministries in other countries are expressing concern. It seems that experts around the world, from Japan to Israel to Italy are re-evaluating the safety record of the HPV vaccine, while American health officials prefer to ignore it.” – Greg Bennett, CBCD

The Center continues to believe that the poor safety record of the HPV vaccine is due to the fragments of foreign DNA contained in the vaccine. The CBCD suggests that these foreign DNA fragments could be a cause of the autoimmune conditions observed by the Israeli scientists, as suggested by Dr. Hanan Polansky’s Microcompetition with Foreign DNA Theory.

The CBCD therefore suggests that with medical doctors and researchers in Israel raising concerns about the HPV vaccine, American pediatricians and OBGYNs should consider all the data. Doctors across America should take into account recent research on the HPV vaccine coming out of Israel, and should not rely solely on the FDA and CDC’s official opinion.

For more information on the Center for the Biology of Chronic Disease and the dangers posed by foreign DNA, visit http://www.cbcd.net. To request an interview or to speak with a CBCD official, please Email info (AT) CBCD (DOT) net.

References:

(1)    http://www.jpost.com/Health-and-Science/HPV-To-vaccinate-or-not-to-vaccinate-326711

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The CBCD is a research center recognized by the IRS as a 501(c)(3) non-for-profit organization. The mission of the CBCD is to advance the research on the biology of chronic diseases, and to accelerate the discovery of treatments.

The CBCD published the “Purple” book by Dr. Hanan Polansky. The book presents Dr. Polansky’s highly acclaimed scientific theory on the relationship between foreign DNA and the onset of chronic diseases. Dr. Polansky’s book is available as a free download from the CBCD website.


Contact

  • Hanan Polansky
    Center for the Biology of Chronic Disease (CBCD)
    +1 (585) 250-9999
    Email