Nonprofit, Project Night Night Finds New Strategies to Engage Children in Philanthropy

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By hosting a Virtual Lemonade Stand, children can engage in philanthropic work without the mess of juicing lemons and spilling sugar.

Virtual Lemonade Stand

Project Night Night will build the child his or her own webpage where donors can choose to sponsor a glass, a pitcher, or lemonade for a group.

In today’s high tech society, it is no surprise that San Francisco based charity, Project Night Night, has begun to raise funds through its “Virtual Lemonade Stand” campaign. By hosting a Virtual Lemonade Stand, children can engage in philanthropic work without the mess of juicing lemons and spilling sugar. Project Night Night will build the child his or her own webpage where donors can choose to sponsor a glass, a pitcher, or lemonade for a group. All money goes directly to Project Night Night. This is one of the many kids fundraising ideas on the charity’s website.

“We want to provide a streamlined way for children to get involved in philanthropy at an early age,” states Kendra Robins, Founder and Executive Director of Project Night Night. “To that end, we are delighted through technology, children can support other children who are less fortunate almost immediately. Everyone loves a lemonade stand, so the idea of buying virtual lemonade has been well received. This campaign will help us provide our Night Night Packages to more than 25,000 homeless children this year. Further, by introducing kids to charitable work, it sets them on a path to doing good deeds for others for the rest of their lives. It’s really a win-win situation.”

Project Night Night is a not-for-profit organization that provides to homeless children, ages 0 to 12, some of the most important basics of life —free of charge. We call these basics “Night Night packages” and each includes a new security blanket, an age-appropriate children's book, and a stuffed animal -- all nestled inside a canvas tote bag. We provide the physical goods that children need to be safe, secure, and ready to learn.

One in 50 children is homeless in the United States, according to a recent report released by the National Center on Family Homelessness. With more than 1.5 million children without a home, there are more homeless families now than at any other time since the Great Depression. The study shows that 42% of homeless children are younger than 6 years old. Visit Project Night Night to learn more.

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Jessica Bryan
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