Young Adults are Affected by Their Parents’ Alcoholism, and Newly Released Results From a SAMHSA Survey Reveal Just How Much Drinking is Taking Place

Al-Anon meetings provide a safe place for young people to gain strength and support when they are dealing with the effects of a parent’s alcoholism. Newly released results from a SAMHSA survey reveal how many people of a mature parental age are abusing alcohol.

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Strength and hope for friends and families of problem drinkers

Al-Anon Family Groups

For young adults, dealing with chaos from a parent’s alcoholism can be particularly upsetting, as this may take the place of parental support and advice for all of life’s big decisions.

Virginia Beach, VA (PRWEB) September 30, 2013

Results from a survey* by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), reveal that at least 14.3 percent of persons aged 40-64 reported drinking five or more drinks on the same occasion on at least one day in the past 30 days. Among those aged 40-44, 27 percent reported the same.

“When young adults are worrying about their parents drinking, they may begin to neglect their own lives while they are trying to build a career and start a family of their own,” said Pamela Walters, Information Analyst at Al-Anon Family Group Headquarters, Inc. “For young adults, dealing with chaos from a parent’s alcoholism can be particularly upsetting, as this may take the place of parental support and advice for all of life’s big decisions,” said Walters.

According to Al-Anon’s 2012 Membership Survey, 45 percent of Al-Anon members said their lives have been negatively affected due to the problem drinking of a father or step-father. Twenty percent of members said the same of a mother or step-mother.

Walters said, “If you are a young adult who is troubled by a parent’s drinking, Al-Anon is a resource for you to get back to peace of mind, and the doors of Al-Anon are always open to anyone who has been affected by a loved one’s drinking.”

Al-Anon Family Groups are for families and friends who have been affected by the problem drinking of someone close to them. Nearly 16,000 local groups meet every week throughout the U.S., Canada, Bermuda, and Puerto Rico. Al-Anon Family Groups meet in more than 130 countries, and Al-Anon literature is available in more than 40 languages. Al-Anon Family Groups have been offering strength and support to families and friends of alcoholics since 1951. Al-Anon Family Group Headquarters, Inc. acts as the clearinghouse worldwide for inquiries from those who need help or want information about Al-Anon Family Groups and Alateen, its program for teenage members.

For more information about Al-Anon Family Groups, go to http://www.al-anon.alateen.org, or read a copy of "Al-Anon Faces Alcoholism 2014." Find a local meeting by calling toll-free: 1-888-4AL-ANON.

  • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, "Results from the 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Summary of National Findings," NSDUH Series H-46, HHS Publication No. (SMA) 13-4795. Rockville, MD: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2013.