Gonzales Resident Beats the Odds and Reunites with Acadian Ambulance Paramedic

Five months ago, Kathleen LeBlanc defied death. On the evening of May 16th, Kathleen and her husband Lynn were preparing to eat dinner, when Kathleen’s health rapidly declined and she went into cardiac arrest.

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Cutline: Kathleen LeBlanc and Paramedic Eric Smith

Permanent brain damage can begin after just four minutes with no oxygen and Mrs. LeBlanc was unresponsive for close to 10, said Smith. To see her well after only a few short months since the incident is remarkable.

Lafayette, LA (PRWEB) September 27, 2013

Five months ago, Kathleen LeBlanc defied death. On the evening of May 16th, Kathleen and her husband Lynn were preparing to eat dinner, when Kathleen’s health rapidly declined and she went into cardiac arrest.

“My wife is diabetic,” said Lynn LeBlanc. “My first thought was that she was having an episode, so I called my sister who lives next door for assistance.”

“I almost didn’t answer the phone thinking it was a telemarketer,” said Shirley Clouatre. “I was tending to my yard and picked up the phone on the last ring. As soon as I reached my brother’s house, I knew this was an issue we couldn’t handle and I immediately dialed 911.”

Paramedic Eric Smith and EMT-Basic Eric Clement arrived on scene where St. Amant Fire Department had already begun CPR on LeBlanc.

“Permanent brain damage can begin after just four minutes with no oxygen and Mrs. LeBlanc was unresponsive for close to 10,” said Smith. “To see her well after only a few short months since the incident is remarkable.”

Enduring close to a month of rehabilitation and hospital visits, Kathleen LeBlanc has a different outlook on life.

“I have a new normal now,” she said. “I was given my life back and I can’t comprehend how you don’t thank someone for that, for your life. I’m a wife, a mother, and grandmother, and due to the teamwork of Acadian Ambulance and the St. Amant Fire Department, I have the ability to continue these roles.”

“The national survival rate of a cardiac patient is eight to ten percent,” said Operations Manager Justin Cox. “This statistic speaks volumes for not only the excellence of our team, the importance of early CPR, but most importantly, the perseverance Mrs. LeBlanc had to fight and live.”

“It’s a lot of emotions rolled up in one, and you can't explain it in words," said Smith. "To give Mrs. LeBlanc some time back with her family is worth all the blood, sweat, tears, and time spent away from your loved ones."

Since 1971, Acadian has provided the highest level of emergency medical care and transportation possible. In the past decade, the company has expanded to include a diverse suite of services in health, safety, and transportation. Acadian's six divisions are Acadian Ambulance Service, Acadian Monitoring Services, Air Med, Executive Aircraft Charter Service, National EMS Academy and Safety Management Systems.


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