Rise in Deaths of Cyclists Sparks Readers to Offer Solutions

Law firm, the Accident Advice Helpline, comments on the BBC Debate on Keeping Cyclists Safe

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(PRWEB UK) 3 January 2014

In recent weeks there has been a worrying increase in the number of cyclist deaths in the UK. It is a well-known fact that many drivers view cyclists as an inconvenience, but it is clear there are measures to be taken in order to protect cyclists.

A number of readers have responded to the debate on cyclists and have been in touch with the BBC to offer solutions, which may help protect cyclists in the future.

One reader suggested that cyclists should have their own traffic lights, in addition to their own lane. It is thought that this may help reduce the collisions between drivers and cyclists.

Another reader questioned whether the cycling proficiency test was still being practiced, and if not, suggested that it should be re-introduced. The cycling proficiency test helps teach cyclists the basics of how to keep safe on the road.

Although most cyclists wear the correct clothing to ensure visibility on the road, one reader has suggested that it should be compulsory for cyclists to wear high visibility clothing at all times, as this is bound to reduce the rate of accidents on the road. TC from Walthamstow, London said, "It should be law to wear some hi-vis while cycling. You cannot always blame the motorists."

One simple suggestion from a reader was that there should be more respect on the road, both with drivers and cyclists.

A spokesman from Accident Advice Helpline, a leading personal injury claim company, stated, “Accidents on the road are a common accident claim, and if you have suffered injuries as a result of this and it was not your fault, you may be entitled to make a claim.”

The Accident Advice Helpline deal with accident claims for those who were not to blame and wish to seek compensation for their injury. If you have an injury claim and wish to talk to a specialist, you can find out more by calling 0800 689 0500.

Reference: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-25043437


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