The Child Neurology Foundation Partners with CRAVE Restaurants for Month-Long Fundraising Initiative

The Child Neurology Foundation (CNF), a national nonprofit focused on advocacy for children and adolescents with neurological and developmental disorders, today announced a unique, month-long partnership with CRAVE Restaurants as part of the CRAVE Cares initiative.

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Minneapolis, MN (PRWEB) January 04, 2014

The Child Neurology Foundation (CNF), a national nonprofit focused on advocacy for children and adolescents with neurological and developmental disorders, today announced a unique, month-long partnership with CRAVE Restaurants as part of the CRAVE Cares initiative. Guests who dine at any CRAVE Restaurant during the month of January will support finding cures for the 400+ brain disorders that affect nearly 18,000,000 children in North America.

CNF recognizes that development of clinician-researchers is extremely important to the field of child neurology, but many challenges impede this effort. Funding from the CRAVE Cares initiative will support CNF’s mission of advocating for children and adolescents with neurologic and developmental disorders, fund neurologic research of young investigators, promote awareness of career opportunities in child neurology and provide public, professional, and patient education programs.

“The outcome of this partnership is that CNF will be able to further our ability to provide information, education, and advocacy for child neurologists and other medical professionals—and continue our support for the patients, parents, and member groups dealing with an array of neurologic conditions.”, says John Stone, Executive Director for the Child Neurology Foundation.

About the Child Neurology Foundation (CNF)
Founded in October 2001, the Child Neurology Foundation was created to provide research funding to help young investigators and advocacy support for families of children living with one or more neurologic disorders. One-in-four children (or 18 million) American children are affected.


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