Study Shows Promise for Those with Stress and Sleep Difficulties

According to Ron Minson, MD, Clinical Director at Integrated Listening Systems (iLs), the manufacturer of the Dreampad, a pilot study measuring the ability of a new product, a pillow which delivers music through vibration, indicates it may help those challenged by stress-related symptoms. Over 80% of those in the study showed a significant relaxation response within 15 minutes of using the pillow.

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The Dreampad helps them relax and improves their sleep, which impacts school/work performance, relationships and emotional stability.

Denver, CO (PRWEB) January 23, 2014

Preliminary research measuring the effect of new technology, a pillow which delivers music through vibration, showed a significant increase in the participants’ ability to relax. The study assessed relaxation using heart rate variability (HRV), the most accepted means of objectively measuring the autonomic nervous system’s relaxation response. The new technology is in the form of a pillow, known as the Dreampad™, which emits a musical vibration audible only to the user. The study was conducted by Kelly Olson, PhD, Director of Clinical Research and Development for SleepImage, LLC, and released on January 20, 2014.

According to Ron Minson, MD, Clinical Director at Integrated Listening Systems (iLs), the manufacturer of the Dreampad, “When you lay your head on the Dreampad, the music travels internally to your inner ear. This process appears to stimulate the vagus nerve, which plays a key role in our ability to de-stress. This new data reinforces what we are seeing clinically with children and adults who suffer from stress, anxiety and trauma – the Dreampad helps them relax and improves their sleep, which impacts school/work performance, relationships and emotional stability.”

The study used SleepImage, a portable device for collecting HRV and sleep data, to measure the change in HRV. Baseline data (without Dreampad) was compared with data taken while subjects were using the Dreampad over a 15-minute period. Nine of the eleven adults in the study showed significant increase in parasympathetic activity after 15 minutes of using the Dreampad.

This preliminary study suggests that the Dreampad may be helpful in promoting parasympathetic dominance, which creates a more favorable internal environment for resting and sleeping. The product developers report that plans are underway for formal studies measuring the efficacy of the Dreampad with a variety of populations.


Contact

  • Kristen Hitner
    SleepImage
    720-708-4204
    Email