Surgeon General: Smoking Linked to More than a Dozen Cancers; the CBCD Explains Link between Smoking, EBV Reactivation and Cancer

A report published on January 17, 2014 on aljazeera.com said that “researchers newly confirmed smoking as a cause of more than a dozen types of cancer, including liver cancer and colorectal cancer, and …a variety of immune-system disorders (1).” The Center for the Biology of Chronic Disease (CBCD) highlights how smoking can reactivate the Epstein Barr Virus, and lead to cancer.

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It’s very important for individuals to realize that smoking has many harmful effects. Reactivating the Epstein Barr Virus is one of them. - Greg Bennett, CBCD

Rochester, NY (PRWEB) February 03, 2014

According to the U.S. Surgeon General, “smoking-related diseases will lead to the premature deaths of half a million adults in 2014…In addition, researchers newly confirmed smoking as a cause of more than a dozen types of cancer, including liver cancer and colorectal cancer, and a host of other health problems, including Type 2 diabetes, erectile dysfunction, rheumatoid arthritis and a variety of immune-system disorders. (1).” Research shows that some cancers linked to smoking are also linked to the reactivation of the Epstein Barr Virus (EBV). These studies have also shown that smoking harms the immune system, which allows the reactivation of EBV. One study found that “Smoking was the only factor linked to EBV seropositivity among the expanded control group and the independent low-risk population. In vitro experiments showed that cigarette smoke extract promoted EBV replication, induced the expression of the immediate-early transcriptional activators Zta and Rta, and increased transcriptional expression levels of BFRF3 and gp350 in the lytic phase.” (See the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, from September 19, 2012) (2). Thus, the latent Epstein Barr Virus may be the underlying cause of some smoking related cancers, such as Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma (NPC).

How do scientists know that smoking can cause the EBV to reactivate?

Smoking harms the immune system, which keeps it from suppressing the latent EBV. The Journal of the National Cancer Institute study authors wrote that “We verified that cigarette smoking and elevated VCA-IgA antibodies were both associated with NPC risk (2).” Thus, “in NPC carcinogenesis, cigarette smoking may play an alternative role via induction of EBV reactivation (2).”

“Cigarette smoking produces several reactive forms of agents, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, aromatic amines, and N-nitrosamines, resulting in the formation of DNA adducts, which cause DNA damage (2).” These chemicals are associated with seropositivity of EBV. Study authors wrote further that “there has been a consistent trend showing a link between cigarette smoking and EBV-positivity in NPC or Hodgkin lymphoma patients (2).”

In addition to reactivating the EBV, which leads to some forms of cancer, smoking can also keep the immune system from fighting other disease causing organisms. For example, effects of tobacco smoke on the immune system include: Greater susceptibility to infections such as pneumonia and influenza, more severe and longer-lasting illnesses, and lower levels of protective antioxidants (such as vitamin C), in the blood. (See betterhealth.vic.gov.au, last reviewed May 2013) (3).

“It’s very important for individuals to realize that smoking has many harmful effects. Reactivating the Epstein Barr Virus is one of them. The reactivated virus is linked to multiple cancers, and thus the Center urges people to cease smoking. In addition, people should consider taking a natural supplement designed to target the latent EBV virus, and therefore provide some protection against the damages of smoking.” Greg Bennett, CBCD.

The CBCD recommends that individuals turn to the CBCD’s website at http://www.cbcd.net for a better understanding of the risks posed by the latent EBV.

References:

(1) US explores tobacco’s endgame, as report lists new known harms. Published on January 17, 2014.
http://america.aljazeera.com/articles/2014/1/17/surgeon-general-publishes50thanniversarysmokingreport.html

(2) An epidemiological and molecular study of the relationship between smoking, risk of nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and Epstein-Barr virus activation. Published on September 19, 2012.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22972969

(3) Better Health Channel - Smoking - Effects on Your Body. Last reviewed on May 2013.
http://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/bhcv2/bhcarticles.nsf/pages/Smoking_effects_on_your_body

The CBCD is a research center recognized by the IRS as a 501(c)(3) non-for-profit organization. The mission of the CBCD is to advance the research on the biology of chronic diseases, and to accelerate the discovery of treatments.

The CBCD published the “Purple” book by Dr. Hanan Polansky. The book presents Dr. Polansky’s highly acclaimed scientific theory on the relationship between foreign DNA and the onset of chronic diseases. Dr. Polansky’s book is available as a free download from the CBCD website.


Contact

  • Hanan Polansky
    Center for the Biology of Chronic Disease (CBCD)
    +1 (585) 250-9999
    Email