U.S. Solitary Confinement Practices of Immigrant Detainees Deficient: International Human Rights Students, Experts at John Marshall in Chicago

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New research from the International Human Rights Clinic at The John Marshall Law School details deficiencies in current U.S. detention practices, as well as recommends measures to ensure immigrant detainees are protected and treated humanely.

U.S. Solitary Confinement Practices of Immigrant Detainees Deficient: International Human Rights Students, Experts at John Marshall in Chicago

New research from the International Human Rights Clinic at The John Marshall Law School details deficiencies in current U.S. detention practices, as well as recommends measures to ensure immigrant detainees are protected and treated humanely.

The report, “U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s New Directive on Segregation: Why We Need Further Protections,” will be released a Feb. 7 forum on the use of solitary confinement within the context of immigration detention. Panelists will discuss current U.S. policies regulating the treatment of immigrant detainees in confinement, focusing on the three detention facilities that have been found to have the worst record pertaining to solitary confinement use.

The forum is being supported by cooperating entities the American Bar Association Section of International Law, as well as the American Constitution Society for Law and Policy.

The International Human Rights Clinic is the latest clinical learning experience offered at The John Marshall Law School. The clinic offers law students a background in human rights advocacy through the practical experience of working on international human rights cases and projects.

The detainee confinement panel will be held Friday, Feb. 7, 2014. It is worth 1.5 CLE hours for $50, or free for no CLE. Forum panelists will be:

  •     Jennifer Chan, Associate Director of Policy, National Immigrant Justice Center at the Heartland Alliance for Human Needs & Human Rights
  •     Steven Schwinn, Associate Professor; Co-Director, International Human Rights Clinic, The John Marshall Law School
  •     Sarah Dávila-Ruhaak, Co-Director, International Human Rights Clinic

EVENT DETAILS:

Who: International Human Rights Clinic, The John Marshall Law School

What: “U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s New Directive on Segregation: Why We Need Further Protections”

Where: John Marshall, 315 S. Plymouth Court, Chicago, IL 60604

When: 10 – 11:30 a.m., Friday, Feb. 7

Go to http://events.jmls.edu/registration/node/522 to register. For more information, please contact Christine Kraly at ckraly(at)jmls(dot)edu

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Christine Kraly
The John Marshall Law School
+1 (312) 427-2737 Ext: 171
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Marilyn Thomas
The John Marshall Law School
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