Al-Anon Provides Confidential Support for Families Who Were Affected by Someone’s Drinking During the Super Bowl

It is unnecessary to avoid social situations or to isolate out of fear, because of a loved one’s drinking. Al-Anon Family Groups provide a confidential environment for people to deal with the frustrations of living with a problem drinker.

Virginia Beach, VA (PRWEB) February 11, 2014

While a worldwide audience watched the Super Bowl, some fans were also watching each other. The fans who focused on a loved one with a drinking problem may have found it difficult to enjoy the big game. “Embarrassment, resentment, and anxiety can take a lot of enjoyment away from sporting events, holidays, and other celebrations,” according to Pamela Walters, Information Analyst for Al-Anon Family Groups.

“I felt terrible when I had to make excuses for my wife,” an anonymous Al-Anon member said. Anonymity is an important principle in the Al-Anon program. Jack P. said, “I invited co-workers and supervisors to our house for the game, but my wife passed out in the bedroom during half-time. I told everyone she was exhausted from preparing all of the food. I don’t know if anyone believed me, or even cared.”

Al-Anon Family Groups provide a confidential environment for people to deal with the frustrations of living with a problem drinker. Social insecurities can be less embarrassing when people hear that others have had similar experiences. People begin to realize that it is possible to find contentment and even happiness in Al-Anon and Alateen, whether their loved ones continue to drink or not. “People who think drinking problems are only happening in their family probably haven’t tried a local Al-Anon meeting, yet,” Pamela Walters said.

In Al-Anon it isn’t necessary to avoid social situations or to isolate out of fear, because of a loved one’s drinking. Over 25 percent of the population has been affected by someone who drinks, according to the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration. At least one-third of the population in Canada has experienced harm due to someone else’s drinking, according to the Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse.

Al-Anon Family Groups are for families and friends who have been affected by the problem drinking of someone close to them. Nearly 16,000 local groups meet every week throughout the U.S., Canada, Bermuda, and Puerto Rico. Al-Anon Family Groups meet in more than 130 countries, and Al-Anon literature is available in more than 40 languages. Al-Anon Family Groups have been offering strength and support to families and friends of alcoholics since 1951. Al-Anon Family Group Headquarters, Inc. acts as the clearinghouse worldwide for inquiries from those who need help or want information about Al-Anon Family Groups and Alateen, its program for teenage members.

For more information about Al-Anon Family Groups, go to http://www.al-anon.alateen.org, or read a copy of "Al-Anon Faces Alcoholism 2014." Find a local meeting by calling toll-free: 1-888-4AL-ANON.