Young Athletes with Knee Pain May Turn to Meniscus Transplant New Data Shows Positive Results for Meniscal Allograft Transplantation (MAT) Surgery

Patients undergoing meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT) surgery require an additional operation approximately 32% of the time, but overall see a 95% success rate after an average five-year follow-up, according to new research released today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine’s (AOSSM) Specialty Day.

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Our latest data shows that patients with damaged knees can certainly recover and return to form with the right kinds of treatment.- Frank McCormick, MD

New Orleans, LA (PRWEB) March 15, 2014

Patients undergoing meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT) surgery require an additional operation approximately 32% of the time, but overall see a 95% success rate after an average five-year follow-up, according to new research released today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine’s (AOSSM) Specialty Day.

"Our research shows a positive mid to long-term outcome for patients who require MAT surgery," commented lead author Dr. Frank McCormick from Holy Cross Orthopedic Institute in Fort Lauderdale Florida, and Rush University Medical Center in Chicago. "While 64 patients out of the 172 we followed needed additional surgery, the overall survival of transplanted grafts suggests we can confidently recommend this procedure moving forward."

The study took place from January 2003 to April 2011, with patients receiving the same surgical technique as well as the same 4-6 week rehab. Follow-up surgeries included removal of tissue, equipment, and in some cases a revision of the original surgery.

"A healthy meniscus is critical to a fully functioning knee, and so also key to leading an active lifestyle," noted McCormick. "Our latest data shows that patients with damaged knees can certainly recover and return to form with the right kinds of treatment."

The American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) is a world leader in sports medicine education, research, communication and fellowship, and includes national and international orthopaedic sports medicine leaders. The Society works closely with many other sports medicine specialists, including athletic trainers, physical therapists, family physicians, and others to improve the identification, prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation of sports injuries. AOSSM is also a founding partner of the STOP Sports Injuries campaign to prevent overuse and traumatic injuries in kids. For more information on AOSSM or the STOP Sports Injuries campaign, visit http://www.sportsmed.org or http://www.stopsportsinjuries.org.


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AOSSM SD Press Releases


Specialty Day Abstracts 2014