SentTell Offers Parents Anti-Sexting Smartphone App

The SentTell anti-sexting app eliminates sexting from teens. For the first time a free anti-sexting app has been created for parents to monitor their children in real time.

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SentTell anti-sexting logo

SentTell Logo

I want parents to be able to use this tool as a segue into talking to their children about the dangers of sexting and how ‘digital’ means ‘permanent’.

San Francisco, CA (PRWEB) March 31, 2014

SentTell, a San Francisco startup, has developed a free application for Android smartphones to prevent sexting by young adults. The application notifies parents whenever photos are taken using their children’s camera.

SentTell is the first and only company to give parents a tool to eliminate sexting on smartphones by young adults for free.

The idea came to SentTell founder, Walter Wallace, after reading a tragic story about a high school girl who shared revealing photos that were later circulated around her campus. She experienced ridicule, embarrassment, and anxiety, which eventually led to her suicide. Walter says, “I was the last generation in high school who didn't have to carry this level of responsibility in regards to digital media.” He goes on to say, “I want parents to be able to use this tool as a segue into talking to their children about the dangers of sexting and how ‘digital’ means ‘permanent’.”

The application also comes with safeguards such as; if the application is deleted from the phone a time-stamped email is sent to the parent, notifying him or her that the application has been removed. This tells the parent exactly when the application was removed and provides a conversational segue about the incident.

The main goal of SentTell is to preserve the social reputation of young adults through prevention. With the recent prosecution of two young men (aged 15 and 18) for the solicitation and possession of child porn with intent to distribute, and with recent Pew research data showing that 15% of 12- to 17-year-olds admit to receiving sexually suggestive material in text messages, it is now more important than ever to curb risky behavior and educate the next generation on how their decisions today will affect them for the rest of their lives.

For the most recent updates about the SentTell application follow SentTell on Twitter @senttell or visit the website at http://www.senttell.com.


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