FDA Approval of Medical Device Good News for Brain Injury Patients, Indiana Personal Injury Attorney Says

Mike Stephenson, a partner with McNeely Stephenson Thopy & Harrold, says announcement by Indiana Cook Medical about biomaterial for repair of brain fluid leaks is perfectly timed for Brain Injury Awareness Month.

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Indiana Attorney Mike Stephenson

“Victims of a traumatic brain injury face so many risks, from the initial hospitalization and treatment to their reintegration into society. For the millions who suffer a TBI, research and medical advances are essential to their very survival,”

Shelbyville, Ind. (PRWEB) March 23, 2014

Cook Medical, a medical products company headquartered in Bloomington, Ind., has received FDA approval for use of their Biodesign® Dural Graft in patients who experience a leakage of cerebrospinal fluid after surgery or a brain injury.

While biomaterials have been used for many years in other applications, like hernia surgery, expanding their scope to include brain repair holds promise for millions who sustain traumatic brain injury. "We're serving a whole new patient population here," said Tom Cherry, global leader for Cook's head and neck surgery division, in the March 15 issue of the Indy Star.

According to the Brain Injury Association, 2.4 million Americans sustain a brain injury each year from falls, car crashes, and workplace injuries, as well as assaults and military service. Eighty percent of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks occur after a non-surgical head trauma, according to one study, so this new approach to treating them holds real promise, said Indianapolis personal injury Mike Stephenson.

“Victims of a traumatic brain injury face so many risks, from the initial hospitalization and treatment to their reintegration into society. For the millions who suffer a TBI, research and medical advances are essential to their very survival,” said Stephenson. “And what better time to begin marketing this brain graft material than in March, Brain Injury Awareness Month.”

The brain graft product is made from the lining of pig intestines which is sterilized and treated, leaving a paper-thin sheet with the ability to promote tissue regeneration wherever it is inserted. In time, the biomaterial is absorbed by the body.

ABOUT MIKE STEPHENSON:
Mike Stephenson, a partner with McNeely Stephenson Thopy & Harrold of Shelbyville, Indiana, near Indianapolis, has been successfully practicing personal injury law, including cases in which a brain injury resulted from a catastrophic accident, since 1981. He can be reached at 1-855-206-2555.


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