2 Your Health Publishes Easy Low Potassium Shopping List for Kidney Patients

New Downloadable List of 50 Foods Low in Potassium

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Hickory, North Carolina (PRWEB) March 31, 2014

Potassium is a vital nutrient that affects nerves and muscles. Keeping the right balance of potassium in your body is vital to keep you healthy and on the move. Too much potassium in your system can cause things like an irregular heartbeat.

The good news is that if you eat too much food with high potassium levels, the kidney excretes the excess potassium as a self-regulating mechanism. The bad news is that many people have kidney issues including chronic kidney disease (CKD) and the kidney does not perform this function well.

So they need to be more conscious about regulating their potassium intake and not rely on their kidneys to do the job.

Registered dietitian and blogger Carla Spencer has produced a handy, free downloadable list of "50 Foods Low in Potassium" which can be accessed at http://www.2yourhealth.com/ckd-diet-50-low-potassium-foods.

This list includes several categories of common foods like fruits, vegetables, breads, meats, and even name brand soft drinks.

Milligrams of potassium are listed for each item with easy reference to food quantities.

This makes a great one-page companion for grocery store visits of those keeping an eye on their potassium levels.

Other posts on 2YourHealth.com are helpful from a food consumption standpoint for those dealing with poorly functioning kidneys. Topics of related posts include "Kidney Disease Foods to Avoid", "How to Improve Kidney Function in 5 Steps", "Advice On Taking Herbs for Kidney Health", "17 Kidney Friendly Foods to Savor", and more.

About 2YourHealth
2 Your Health is dedicated to becoming your go-to website for expertise, products and services to enhance and enable individuals with diabetes, cardiovascular disease, CKD and renal disease and their families to maintain long-term health for their greatest benefit at their highest attainable level. The focus is on what “can be done” versus what ”can’t be done.”

The site is edited by Registered Dietitian - Carla D Spencer MBA RD LD CN.


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