Dr. Michael L. Lomax of UNCF Discusses the Importance of Supporting HBCUs and African American Students

UNCF unveils new white paper on the Parent PLUS Loan crisis and its impact on the African American community.

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Washington, DC (PRWEB) March 25, 2014

Michael L. Lomax, Ph.D., president and CEO of UNCF (the United Negro College Fund,) spoke at the National Press Club in Washington, DC, on Tuesday, March 25, about the critical role played by HBCU’s in improving educational outcomes for African American students and the role higher education plays in achieving economic equity for the African American community at large.

“HBCUs have played, and continue to play an outside role, when HBCUs that represent only four percent of the nation’s four-year colleges yet account for almost 20 percent of African American bachelor degree recipients,” said Dr. Lomax. “We all have a role to play in overcoming the current crisis and ensuring their success and long-term viability. All who have a serious interest in higher education should consider donating to HBCUs and UNCF. And please remember, a mind is a terrible thing to waste, but a wonderful thing to invest in.”

Dr. Lomax was joined at the National Press Club Speakers Luncheon by national education leaders, as well as by Representatives John Lewis (D-GA) and Danny Davis (D-IL). During the Luncheon, UNCF distributed a white paper on the Parent PLUS Loan crisis facing African American families.

About UNCF

UNCF (United Negro College Fund) is the nation’s largest and most effective minority education organization. To serve youth, the community and the nation, UNCF supports students’ education and development through scholarships and other programs, strengthens its 37 member colleges and universities, and advocates for the importance of minority education and college readiness. UNCF institutions and other historically black colleges and universities are highly effective, awarding 20 percent of African American baccalaureate degrees. UNCF administers more than 400 programs, including scholarship, internship and fellowship, mentoring, summer enrichment, and curriculum and faculty development programs. Today, UNCF supports more than 60,000 students at over 900 colleges and universities. Learn more at http://www.uncf.org.


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